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I just changed piano tuners. He tuned my Yamaha GC1 grand piano to A440. I was surprised at his raising the pitch to A440. My previous piano tuner tuned it within the piano itself.
I just realized this might not be something I wanted. Why do you think he chose to do that process which stretched the strings and might need frequent retuning.
Give me some feedback on both methods.

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Your piano was built to be at A-440. "Tuning to itself" is ambiguous, as instruments do not go out of tune uniformly, so the question becomes, what are you tuning to? A above Middle C is near the area where the piano is most likely to go out of tune, so by tuning that A to 440 could very well be more "tuning to itself" than not.


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Thanks BDB. So is it standard piano tuning to do what my new piano tuner did? He called it piano tuning with a Pitch raise?

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Yes. Other than floating the pitch ever so slightly sharp or flat to match seasonal humidity fluctuations, on a modern piano that’s not neglected (the GC1 is definitely not an older model), the approach of your original tuner seems a bit lazy. Depending on the market, this piano was probably designed to be tuned between A440-442. Most tuners in North America use 440 as the reference.

The pitch reference becomes more important if the piano is used for recording or chamber music.


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Originally Posted by terminaldegree
. . .
The pitch reference becomes more important if the piano is used for recording or chamber music.

+1 !!!

String players (including guitarists) can re-tune fairly easily. But woodwind and brass players won't thank you, if you have a piano which is "tuned to itself", but which isn't tuned to "concert pitch" (A = 440, or close to it).


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Tuning to a standard also becomes important while developing pitch memory...

With zoom lessons during the pandemic, I tuned for many new clients when the teacher finally heard that the family piano was so flat or just out of tune with itself!

"The piece starts on C, not B..." "I AM playing a C!"

Ron Koval

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To me, he did the right thing. A relatively newer piano just sounds right at a440. It is designed for a440.

An antique that has dropped a lot, well, maybe leave it lower.

That said…
I play with clarinets, trombones, trumpets all the time. If it is kinda in the a440 ballpark they work with it. Outdoor gigs in winter weather mess them up. They still get it done. Good wind/horn players are used to the variables of pitch that happen in real life situations.

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With zoom lessons during the pandemic, I tuned for many new clients when the teacher finally heard that the family piano was so flat or just out of tune with itself!

"The piece starts on C, not B..." "I AM playing a C!"
Ron Koval

HA! Me too Ron laugh


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I'm guessing your previous tuner was pretty inexpensive, and your current one charges significantly more. Am I correct?

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Originally Posted by CaseyVancouver
That said…
I play with clarinets, trombones, trumpets all the time. If it is kinda in the a440 ballpark they work with it. Outdoor gigs in winter weather mess them up. They still get it done. Good wind/horn players are used to the variables of pitch that happen in real life situations.

To me it seems far easier to do this than a few decades back. This is only my theory but it seems reasonable.

When a Stroboconn cost as much as a car, it was anybody's guess what pitch you'd be on at a gig. You needed to adapt at least a quarter tone on the fly. But the rise of $20 electronic tuners in amateur hands meant that group pitch stabilized around A440. And now everybody has a tuner on their phone.

People still play out of tune. But at least they are out of tune to an A440 rather than something outlandish.


gotta go practice

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