2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
52 members (Boboulus, Animisha, benQF, bxrdad1, 36251, beeboss, audiophon, bilb, Calavera, 6 invisible), 1,111 guests, and 635 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,000
S
Sebs Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,000
Is the time to learn pieces generally relative to ones level? For example, pianist A takes 5 weeks to learn a grade 1 piece and has been playing for two years while pianist B can learn grade 3 piece in 5 weeks as they have been playing for 4 years. It’s just a rough example to show what I mean. If it is typically relative, how so? Does the brain just develop and internalize what you learn and it can be applied? Such that we can get things under our fingers more efficiently as we have more exposure and skill?

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,792
D
dmd Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,792
Yes


Don

Kawai MP7SE, Edifier R1850DB Bookshelf speakers, SennHeiser HD 559 Headphones
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,323
P
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,323
I think in general as you progress, the pieces become longer and more technically challenging, so I would say the answer to your question is “no”. Even though you can apply the skills you learned from previous pieces, there are always new challenges. By the time you get to a higher grade level, 5 weeks is unlikely to be enough time to learn a piece.

Of course there are lots of variables: length and complexity of the piece, how quickly one can learn the notes, familiarity with pieces of similar style or composer, how much time you practice and efficiency of practicing, and the pianist’s standard and expectations of what it means to “learn a piece”. It is common for amateurs learning fairly advanced pieces (e.g. RCM Grades 9 and 10) to spend at least 6 months and even more than a year getting it to a level of satisfaction.



Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,943
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,943
Originally Posted by Sebs
Is the time to learn pieces generally relative to ones level?
Yes.

To take a lop-sided example, an advanced pianist (Grade 7/8 ABRSM) can easily sight-read a grade 1 piece perfectly (complete with all phrasing, dynamic and expression markings indicated in the score, plus his own nuances, rubato etc as he deems fit), and after a few more play-throughs, will probably have the piece memorized and ready for performance.

In other words, he could have the piece performance-ready in ten minutes, and play it better than a Grade 2 pianist ever could even if the latter has been practicing it for several weeks.

All students will have experience of their teachers playing their pieces - often just sight-reading them - much better than they themselves ever could.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,000
S
Sebs Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,000
Originally Posted by PianogrlNW
I think in general as you progress, the pieces become longer and more technically challenging, so I would say the answer to your question is “no”. Even though you can apply the skills you learned from previous pieces, there are always new challenges. By the time you get to a higher grade level, 5 weeks is unlikely to be enough time to learn a piece.

Of course there are lots of variables: length and complexity of the piece, how quickly one can learn the notes, familiarity with pieces of similar style or composer, how much time you practice and efficiency of practicing, and the pianist’s standard and expectations of what it means to “learn a piece”. It is common for amateurs learning fairly advanced pieces (e.g. RCM Grades 9 and 10) to spend at least 6 months and even more than a year getting it to a level of satisfaction.

Yup I understand that advanced pianists have pieces that they study for years. I was talking in a general skill set sense.


Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Sebs
Is the time to learn pieces generally relative to ones level?
Yes.

To take a lop-sided example, an advanced pianist (Grade 7/8 ABRSM) can easily sight-read a grade 1 piece perfectly (complete with all phrasing, dynamic and expression markings indicated in the score, plus his own nuances, rubato etc as he deems fit), and after a few more play-throughs, will probably have the piece memorized and ready for performance.

In other words, he could have the piece performance-ready in ten minutes, and play it better than a Grade 2 pianist ever could even if the latter has been practicing it for several weeks.

All students will have experience of their teachers playing their pieces - often just sight-reading them - much better than they themselves ever could.

That’s pretty fascinating as it seems impossible to do that even with simple pieces but I guess it’s all relative. Although come to think of it I cloud sight read a very simple piece and I’m sure one day that very simple piece years ago would have taken me a while to learn. It seems very interesting how music skills develop over time.

Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 2,054
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 2,054
A piece that is longer is not always more challenging. You may be playing something arranged for easy piano that spans 4 pages. Pieces with lots of repetition including passages that are the same or similar but in another key is less challenging unless you're playing variations on a theme that are slightly different each time.

The piece I'm working on has only 3 pages (about 20 bars per page). Each page is a different section. It's a piano arrangement of a piece for 8 instruments. There are high notes in the bass that are notated with the Treble Clef. There are ties & slurs all over and some slurs belong to a middle voice that goes from the top to the bottom staff. And there are overlapping notes with different beats. In other words, lines running all over the page. Initially reading music took much longer. Besides many chords next to each other, there are 4-note chords that span an octave.

Definitely not a piece you sight read the first time and get most of it. What makes the piece playable is the slow tempo and the amount of repetition in it. After learning the notes, the piece still needs work to get it up to a performance level. It's challenging but at the same time fun to play.

Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,451
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,451
Originally Posted by Sebs
That’s pretty fascinating as it seems impossible to do that even with simple pieces but I guess it’s all relative. Although come to think of it I cloud sight read a very simple piece and I’m sure one day that very simple piece years ago would have taken me a while to learn. It seems very interesting how music skills develop over time.
It's fascinating how skills develop over time. While you're learning it seems like you're facing a huge mountain and that your skills stay about the same for a very long time. But little by little you climb that mountain and over a period of years the gains are incredible. Try to record yourself today and listen back a year from now and again two years from now. You will be amazed.

Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,000
S
Sebs Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,000
Originally Posted by Qazsedcft
Originally Posted by Sebs
That’s pretty fascinating as it seems impossible to do that even with simple pieces but I guess it’s all relative. Although come to think of it I cloud sight read a very simple piece and I’m sure one day that very simple piece years ago would have taken me a while to learn. It seems very interesting how music skills develop over time.
It's fascinating how skills develop over time. While you're learning it seems like you're facing a huge mountain and that your skills stay about the same for a very long time. But little by little you climb that mountain and over a period of years the gains are incredible. Try to record yourself today and listen back a year from now and again two years from now. You will be amazed.


Absolutely! I’m attempting the 40 pieces a year challenge and while I might not get 40 done it got me to record and post them which was new to me. So far that the challenge was already a win for me and I can’t wait to look back and those videos in a few years and even play those pieces again.

I’m still amazed at how skill level helps you learn pieces as every pieces seems so different. But I guess once you have a such an advanced foundation and skill you can apply it to many pieces.

Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 1,940
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 1,940
Originally Posted by Sebs
Does the brain just develop and internalize what you learn and it can be applied? Such that we can get things under our fingers more efficiently as we have more exposure and skill?

Yes, but the older you get, the slower this process and the more time and repetitions are needed for anything to be internalised.


Playing the piano is learning to create, playfully and deeply seriously, our own music in the world.
*
... feeling like the pianist on the Titanic ...

Link Copied to Clipboard
What's Hot!!
Pianos - Organs - & Keyboards, Oh My!
Selling Hammond D100 (think B3) Organ & Leslie HL722!
---------------------
Our Fall 2021 Free Newsletter is Out , see it here!
---------------------
My first professionally recorded piece
---------------------
Visit Maine, Meet Mr. Piano World
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Floor space: can I dream of a grand?
by xlider - 10/27/21 02:34 AM
Announcement of new Kawai AURES2 Hybrid Piano
by Daydreaming - 10/27/21 01:17 AM
Minimum repertoire to judge acoustic piano
by TonyDIGITAL - 10/26/21 10:34 PM
Baldwin L vs. Steinway A
by noyes - 10/26/21 06:08 PM
New Steinway O- Yeti Revelation Scoring Grand
by newer player - 10/26/21 01:54 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics209,760
Posts3,142,263
Members103,122
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5