2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
36 members (deadlymajesty, cygnusdei, Calavera, AprilE, DPPianoPhil, 14 invisible), 953 guests, and 739 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Joined: Aug 2021
Posts: 1
M
mattg Offline OP
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
M
Joined: Aug 2021
Posts: 1
Hi all,

I'm 43 and finally decided to start playing the piano after wishing to do so for as long as I can remember. I play acoustic guitar on-off since about 30 years, but have zero experience playing the piano.

I have very basic knowledge of reading sheet music as basically all non-classical guitar stuff is using tabs or chord sheets, i.e. I would need to count up or down from a known note in order to identify a given note etc.

Due to time and financial constraints I want to use one (or two) online piano learning programs.

My ultimate goal is being able to play solo piano arrangements in various genres (pop, rock, blues, jazz, celtic traditionals) and to play piano accompaniments, so nothing overly ambitious (I hope). I don't want to play anything classical (for now).

I had a look at several offerings (Piano For All, Pianote, Playground Sessions, Piano Marvel) and they all seem to be able to bring someone from zero to intermediate but with different approaches.

What would be the best program to use given these goals? I would also be fine with using one program to learn basic technique etc. and then switching to another one.

Piano For All seems to be "chord based" from what I have seen, so it should at least work for the accompany side of things. Does it also teach you to play solo stuff with melody? Piano Marvel seems to have the most in depth content regarding technique and sight reading, but it also seems to be more focused on classical content.

I have seen very favourable reviews of Pianote, but it seems that the content is spread across various "packages" while I would prefer a more structured curriculum.


cheers,
Matthias
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 1,441
L
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 1,441
If it al possible consider lessons with a teacher in person for whatever time you need to get posture, hand position etc where they should be.

Playing with pain is zero fun, it is important to get that all right.


When you play, never mind who listens to you. R.Schumann.

Casio GP-400

2006 August Förster 215
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 4,028
S
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 4,028
Originally Posted by mattg
I have seen very favourable reviews of Pianote, but it seems that the content is spread across various "packages" while I would prefer a more structured curriculum.
Pianote does have two structured packages, the older one called Foundations and the current one called Methods. They might be suitable. You can pick and mix from the other packages as you progress or after completing Methods. They hold feedback recitals, have an online forum, and provide regular enhanced sessions that build on elements within Methods or Foundations.

Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,801
D
dmd Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,801
This is what I would recommend ....

https://homeschoolpiano.com/

Home School Piano is the brainchild of Willie Myette (Jazzedge).

He is the real deal.

He makes a sincere effort to help you become a well rounded pianist, which is what you want.

And .... it is free for 30 days as you try it out.

Good Luck

Last edited by dmd; 08/20/21 11:14 AM.

Don

Kawai MP7SE, Edifier R1850DB Bookshelf speakers, SennHeiser HD 559 Headphones
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 4
H
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
H
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 4
Hi,
Pianote is absolutely value for your money. No complaints. With the monthly or annual membership you get full access to all content. Prior to Pianote, I had a couse Learn and Master Piano, also still available and very good, less content. I have no experience with other learning platforms.

Good Luck!


:-)
Joined: Jan 2021
Posts: 75
R
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
R
Joined: Jan 2021
Posts: 75
FWIW, I’m also an adult beginner and was on a similar quest when I started. If the main limitation is time and need for flexible schedule, have you considered remote lessons with a teacher? That’s what I’ve been doing after trying a couple of online/app options and I’m getting a lot more out of it than I ever could from those platforms. As others hinted, there is also a real danger of learning the wrong fundamentals without direct, personalized feedback. While doing it remotely is not as good as truly in person, it’s still a whole lot more that an impersonal website or app.


Enjoying the journey and the delicious music.
U1
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 641
R
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
R
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 641
You can take remote lessons. If you're dedicated and observant and find a good teacher, they can be quite similar to in person lessons. The only real differences are that the teacher can't physically place your hands at the right place, and they sometimes will have a few seconds of delay before providing feedback, which may sometimes be crucial but can be mitigated if you can keep track of what you are doing.

This will be one of the fastest ways to get better. As I mentioned before, I was self-taught for several years, but I don't recommend it because I had several hours to kill each day and a burning enthusiasm for it, spending hours trying to get the movements right. However, I didn't follow any of these programs and just figured it out by playing repertoire. I don't recommend the programs by the way. At the beginning, if you're learning on your own, you need to really focus on trying to make a 1:1 correspondence between what you're hearing and what you're actually playing. If you have a metronome ticking in the background and a program counting out your wrong notes, that's not going to happen. You need to be able to immediately know while you're playing whether you played wrong notes or not (and they don't matter as much as wrong technique or phrasing or any number of other things).

Last edited by ranjit; 08/21/21 09:42 AM.
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,623
Silver Subscriber
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
Silver Subscriber
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,623
There is also the book Alfred's Basic Adult Piano Course. It's a series of 3 books with CDs. In the old days, a lot of people used those books.



“To send light into the darkness of men’s hearts - such is the duty of the artist.”
- Robert Schumann

Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 2,019
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 2,019
Originally Posted by Serge88
There is also the book Alfred's Basic Adult Piano Course. It's a series of 3 books with CDs. In the old days, a lot of people used those books.

However, that book is not an online course, and it has extremely little information about technique and phrasing.


Playing the piano is learning to create, playfully and deeply seriously, our own music in the world.
*
... feeling like the pianist on the Titanic ...
Joined: Aug 2021
Posts: 15
M
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
M
Joined: Aug 2021
Posts: 15
The faber adult books come with an app (which I think can also hook up to a midi keyboard for following along with the music used in the exercises), and a big list of online videos accompanying them all too

Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 2,019
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 2,019
Originally Posted by mattg
I don't want to play anything classical (for now). [...] I would also be fine with using one program to learn basic technique etc. and then switching to another one.

Even though you are not interested in playing classical music for now, I would really recommend you to chose a program that teaches you basic technique. As a guitar player, you probably know the importance of not just playing the correct note at the right time, but also to learn the correct technique in order to play in a beautiful and expressive way.

There are two online programs that I know will give you feedback on your technique. The very best one is Piano Career Academy and quite okay is Artistworks. For both programs, you can make a recording of you a playing a piece and you'll get feedback. You could consider subscribing to one of these sites for three months or so - just to get the basics, and also to get feedback so you'll know that you are on the right track.


Playing the piano is learning to create, playfully and deeply seriously, our own music in the world.
*
... feeling like the pianist on the Titanic ...
Joined: Jul 2021
Posts: 13
N
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
N
Joined: Jul 2021
Posts: 13
I hope you heard of synthesia on youtube and there is a tool in musescore. Looks like synthesia but it is not synthesia, very useful thing- https://musescore.com/user/1335401/scores/5003715/piano-tutorial

Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,511
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,511
Originally Posted by Nelly Visser
I hope you heard of synthesia on youtube and there is a tool in musescore. Looks like synthesia but it is not synthesia, very useful thing- https://musescore.com/user/1335401/scores/5003715/piano-tutorial
I hope you're not seriously recommending Synthesia for learning music.

Joined: May 2015
Posts: 9,075
Gold Subscriber
9000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
9000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 9,075
Originally Posted by Nelly Visser
I hope you heard of synthesia on youtube and there is a tool in musescore. Looks like synthesia but it is not synthesia, very useful thing- https://musescore.com/user/1335401/scores/5003715/piano-tutorial

You’re promoting muse score in about every post. This is not useful for really learning to play— only fit those that want to copy


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It's ok to be a Work In Progress
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 2,019
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 2,019
You’re promoting muse score in about every post. This is not useful for really learning to play— only fit those that want to copy[/quote]

There are three people here on Piano World that mention musescore in every single post, often quite without relevance. I wonder if they are sock puppets for the same person: Arciom Nesterovich, Henrik Stromberg and now Nelly Visser. It is very annoying.


Playing the piano is learning to create, playfully and deeply seriously, our own music in the world.
*
... feeling like the pianist on the Titanic ...
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 216
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 216
I started learning, not even having known how to read music two years ago. (I'm retired)I used Piano Lessons on The Web. (Tim Wurm) You can check out free content on YouTube. The paid lessons are more in-depth and generally very informative. Lessons are very affordable and access to them does not expire. Don't ignore the technique information or things like counting . After a couple years I have switched to in person lessons and I definitely have basic
deficiencies but I'm improving steadily I think.


SunnyKeys - from Florida but not the Keys. Learning for 2 years.
Newbie - RCM Level 1 etudes, ABRSM Level 1 2019-20 Exam pieces. Sans exams.

Yamaha P125
Ritmuller UP 121

Link Copied to Clipboard
What's Hot!!
Pianos - Organs - & Keyboards, Oh My!
My first professionally recorded piece
---------------------
Visit Maine, Meet Mr. Piano World
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
When Mozart plays a mean trick on you
by cygnusdei - 11/28/21 02:20 AM
Thin\hollow sound - improvement possible?
by TBell - 11/28/21 01:26 AM
Es920
by Jitin - 11/27/21 10:11 PM
Shopping spree reports
by Marc345 - 11/27/21 06:24 PM
Fishy scientific experiment - needs candidates.
by ZeroZero - 11/27/21 04:09 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics210,282
Posts3,149,254
Members103,450
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5