2022 our 25th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
89 members (bluebilly, Adagiette, axomas, BerndAB, brdwyguy, accordeur, 36251, brennbaer, 23 invisible), 2,511 guests, and 332 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 29
G
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
G
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 29
I have been following one Youtube authority who says that learning a new piece should always involve taking a short phrase, first with HS, then together, then adding in dynamics until that phrase is memorized. Then proceed to the next phrase. Definitely not sight reading it over and over, hoping to eventually perfect it (this is what I tend to do). Yet another authority says you should always practice with the sheet music.

If I have memorized pieces of the music, is there any reason to use the sheet music every time I play it? I can see going back to the sheet music to check it periodically, but should I always look at the sheet music?

Along with that, I need to learn to read music faster. Is that something I should practice separately? If I do not use the sheet music but look at my hands, will I become dependant on seeing my hands?

Thanks for your patience with all the questions.

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 10,863
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 10,863
I do not agree with your on-line teacher: as a beginner, the goal should be to develop good reading skills. This means you will not memorize every piece of music that you learn. Play with the music and save memorizing for those few pieces that you want to retain in your memory in case you are asked to play and your music is not available.

Read a lot of music. Yes, you will sometimes need to glance at your hands— but the bulk of your time should have your eyes on the music. You won’t develop good reading skills unless you make reading the focus.

Learning every piece hands separately and then learning hands together is not efficient. Learn as much as you can hands together from the beginning, even at a snail’s pace. Yes, there will be places that have a tricky part— learn hands separately in those.

Here is the Bullet Proof Musician on effective practice

http://musicfpannhs.weebly.com/uploads/2/6/5/5/2655835/8_things_top_practicers_do_differently.pdf

Last edited by dogperson; 10/09/21 10:11 AM.
Joined: Jun 2021
Posts: 73
D
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
D
Joined: Jun 2021
Posts: 73
Originally Posted by dogperson
I do not agree with your on-line teacher: as a beginner, the goal should be to develop good reading skills. This means you will not memorize every piece of music that you learn. Play with the music and save memorizing for those few pieces that you want to retain in your memory in case you are asked to play and your music is not available.

Learning every piece hands separately and then learning hands together is not efficient. Learn as much as you can hands together from the beginning, even at a snail’s pace. Yes, there will be places that have a tricky part— learn hands separately in those.

Here is the Bullet Proof Musician on effective practice

http://musicfpannhs.weebly.com/uploads/2/6/5/5/2655835/8_things_top_practicers_do_differently.pdf
my thinking is: don't memorize but understand. If you understand a piece/tune it will be easier to play and memorize.

"the goal should be to develop good reading skills."
and good ears as well. Aural skills are extremely important.

Last edited by Dantheboogieguy; 10/09/21 10:13 AM.

we need boogie woogie and Mozart. We need Mozart playing boogie woogie.
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 2,570
T
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
T
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 2,570
A beginner piece that has few notes I can read through it easily. After playing it for a while, some of the notes would be memorized (including muscle memory).

When I'm learning a difficult piece, I often do hand separate. A typical church hymn with 4 voices the beats line up so counting is less of an issue. When I'm playing 2 or more parts with slightly different beat patterns, it's easier to count doing 1 part first and fill in the bass a few lines at a time. A Bach fugue with 4 parts it's good to know what each part is doing so you can bring out each voice easily.

People who are in Suzuki are asked to learn the pieces in Book 1 by ear and imitate the teacher's hand positions before learning to read. This is supposed to teach students to focus on listening and play pieces in a more musical way.

After learning a piece, refer to the score periodically to remind yourself the little details. Sometimes you find things that you missed reading before.

Joined: May 2015
Posts: 10,863
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 10,863
Yes, developing aural skills is important. You need to take one step at a time: see a note, play it with no hesitation on the keyboard. Play simple rhythms snd increase your knowledge and skill with more complicated patterns. Listen to yourself: don’t mindlessly practice scales, but listen. Is every note snd sound even in tone snd rhythm? Vary the way you practice them: gif instance, start soft and gradually crescendo up, decrescendo going down.

Skill development is progressive and takes time.

Please consider changing the way you are learning


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It's ok to be a Work In Progress
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 4,036
Z
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Z
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 4,036
Originally Posted by George S
I have been following one Youtube authority who says that learning a new piece should always involve taking a short phrase, first with HS, then together, then adding in dynamics until that phrase is memorized. Then proceed to the next phrase.
Do they include reading through the piece as well?

I include hands together before HS. I include playing through the section as a whole on the day and reading through the piece as a whole frequently to make sure the phrase being worked on is in its correct context not an isolated fragment.

Sight reading a piece "over and over" is definitely not a good way to learn.

I always practise with the sheet music and sometimes I refer to it. This is for repertoire or exam pieces only as I prefer to be free of the score when performing.

Originally Posted by George S
If I have memorized pieces of the music, is there any reason to use the sheet music every time I play it?
Not every time but occasionally.

Originally Posted by George S
I can see going back to the sheet music to check it periodically, but should I always look at the sheet music?
No, not if you're memorising it or intending to play it without the sheet music but yes, if you're intending to use the score.

Originally Posted by George S
Along with that, I need to learn to read music faster. Is that something I should practice separately?
Yes, every day with other pieces.

Practise reading to get better at reading. Practise reading and playing at the same time to get better at reading and playing. Practise memorised etudes to develop mechanical and technical skills and independence of hands, fingers and sides of the brain. Practise reading new music to get better at reading new music. Practise reading with others to get faster at reading new music.

Better will come with regular and conscientious practise; faster will come with time once you get better.

Originally Posted by George S
If I do not use the sheet music but look at my hands, will I become dependent on seeing my hands?
No, not if you've memorised it cognisantly (explicit memory). Yes, if you've memorised it by using repetition only (procedural memory).


Richard
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,650
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,650
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
"the goal should be to develop good reading skills."
and good ears as well. Aural skills are extremely important.
There are many, many skills that need developing to play the piano well. The point of the post you quoted was that those who memorize most of their pieces and stop using the music often do not develop good reading skill because they don't practice it enough. Every time one plays from the music one is practicing their reading skill. Aural skill and the many other skills is a separate issue.

Joined: Jun 2021
Posts: 73
D
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
D
Joined: Jun 2021
Posts: 73
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
"the goal should be to develop good reading skills."
and good ears as well. Aural skills are extremely important.
There are many, many skills that need developing to play the piano well. The point of the post you quoted was that those who memorize most of their pieces and stop using the music often do not develop good reading skill because they don't practice it enough. Every time one plays from the music one is practicing their reading skill. Aural skill and the many other skills is a separate issue.
are you saying that people who memorize music don't read music? I think I know what type you are: the one who is afraid of people not playing music from sheet music.
I have met people who think playing by ear is a bad thing as the only things that is ok is playing from sheet music. What you are reffering to is playing from sheet music but memorizing music so you don't have to rely on only using the sheet music. It's not like we are talking about not suing sheet music at all.
If you only focus on lead sheets you will never learn to read sheetmusic that well and that isn't very good I think. But you also need to play from leadsheets sometimes. Or play from memory.
I say: the more skills you have the better you will be at playing the piano.

Last edited by Dantheboogieguy; 10/09/21 12:29 PM.

we need boogie woogie and Mozart. We need Mozart playing boogie woogie.
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 2,794
G

Platinum Supporter until July 22 2014
2000 Post Club Member
Offline

Platinum Supporter until July 22 2014
2000 Post Club Member
G
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 2,794
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
"the goal should be to develop good reading skills."
and good ears as well. Aural skills are extremely important.
There are many, many skills that need developing to play the piano well. The point of the post you quoted was that those who memorize most of their pieces and stop using the music often do not develop good reading skill because they don't practice it enough...

It is safe to say those who don't rely on their reading skill as much, don't develop it is much. Similarly, those that don't practice memorizing don't develop it as much. But, as we've discussed many times, both are important. Aural skill is in fact highly important and is often not as developed when relying on just reading all the time.

They are both important though, and I do not believe there is any kind of authority that can make claim to what we all should do. It's individual and there are many different goals that can be pursued.

Richard suggests a nice balance of both reading development, aural and memorization development. This would seem to make the most sense overall, as you don't want to neglect any one of these entirely. Certainly not in the long term.

Last edited by Greener; 10/09/21 12:30 PM.
Joined: Jun 2021
Posts: 73
D
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
D
Joined: Jun 2021
Posts: 73
Originally Posted by Greener
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
"the goal should be to develop good reading skills."
and good ears as well. Aural skills are extremely important.
There are many, many skills that need developing to play the piano well. The point of the post you quoted was that those who memorize most of their pieces and stop using the music often do not develop good reading skill because they don't practice it enough...

It is safe to say those who don't rely on their reading skill as much, don't develop it is much. Similarly, those that don't practice memorizing don't develop it as much. But, as we've discussed many times, both are important. Aural skill is in fact highly important and is often not as developed when relying on just reading all the time.

They are both important though, and I do not believe there is any kind of authority that can make claim to what we all should do. It's individual and there are many different goals that can be pursued.

Richard suggests a nice balance of both reading development, aural and memorization development. This would seem to make the most sense overall, as you don't want to neglect any one of these entirely. Certainly not in the long term.
Well, playing by ear is often neglected I have to say. At least, in what we refer to as "classical" piano lessons.


we need boogie woogie and Mozart. We need Mozart playing boogie woogie.
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 29
G
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
G
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 29
Thanks for all the replies. I am an intermediate player trying to learn more advanced pieces. I am working on W.C. Handy and Scott Joplin and these are difficult enough for me that I have to take them slowly. I am also a student of the history of the music of that time so one of my goals is to be able to download music from the digital libraries available and play them quickly to study what was there.

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 2,794
G

Platinum Supporter until July 22 2014
2000 Post Club Member
Offline

Platinum Supporter until July 22 2014
2000 Post Club Member
G
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 2,794
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
Well, playing by ear is often neglected I have to say. At least, in what we refer to as "classical" piano lessons.

In fairness though, learning and playing classical is not well suited to learning to play by ear. But, that doesn't mean you can't still develop your ear through playing classical. When you need to recall something, what it sounds like is a good reminder and develops your ear. So, this is where memorizing can really help strengthen that aspect of your playing.

But again, it shouldn't come down to, which is better or more important.

Reading should be the focus of classical, but not the only focus, of course.

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,650
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,650
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
"the goal should be to develop good reading skills."
and good ears as well. Aural skills are extremely important.
There are many, many skills that need developing to play the piano well. The point of the post you quoted was that those who memorize most of their pieces and stop using the music often do not develop good reading skill because they don't practice it enough. Every time one plays from the music one is practicing their reading skill. Aural skill and the many other skills is a separate issue.
are you saying that people who memorize music don't read music? I think I know what type you are: the one who is afraid of people not playing music from sheet music.
I have met people who think playing by ear is a bad thing as the only things that is ok is playing from sheet music. What you are reffering to is playing from sheet music but memorizing music so you don't have to rely on only using the sheet music. It's not like we are talking about not suing sheet music at all.
If you only focus on lead sheets you will never learn to read sheetmusic that well and that isn't very good I think. But you also need to play from leadsheets sometimes. Or play from memory.
I say: the more skills you have the better you will be at playing the piano.
No one would say your last sentence is not true but your comment about what type of person I am is 100% wrong.

The OP's post is about playing and practicing a piece that has a fully realized score and has nothing to do with playing from a lead sheet or playing pop music by ear. They asked if it was better to always memorize a piece a measure or phrase at a time or play with the score. My comment(and the comment of other posters before me who said the same thing) was that it's better to play mostly from the score because those who try to memorize every piece and stop using the score quickly often never learn to sight read or read music well. There have been many PW threads where the poster has this problem for that reason. It's pretty obvious that every time one plays with the score one is practicing reading or sight reading music, and the more one does that the better one gets at it.

Joined: Jun 2021
Posts: 73
D
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
D
Joined: Jun 2021
Posts: 73
Originally Posted by Greener
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
Well, playing by ear is often neglected I have to say. At least, in what we refer to as "classical" piano lessons.

In fairness though, learning and playing classical is not well suited to learning to play by ear. But, that doesn't mean you can't still develop your ear through playing classical. When you need to recall something, what it sounds like is a good reminder and develops your ear. So, this is where memorizing can really help strengthen that aspect of your playing.

But again, it shouldn't come down to, which is better or more important.

Reading should be the focus of classical, but not the only focus, of course.
I don't really think "classical" vs "non-classical". I might use more sheet music for some music more than others but I might still use playing by ear even if it is a "classical" piece. You are not forced to play a piece onky by using sheet music. You can make up your own arrangements or learn a melody by ear.


we need boogie woogie and Mozart. We need Mozart playing boogie woogie.
Joined: Jun 2021
Posts: 73
D
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
D
Joined: Jun 2021
Posts: 73
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
"the goal should be to develop good reading skills."
and good ears as well. Aural skills are extremely important.
There are many, many skills that need developing to play the piano well. The point of the post you quoted was that those who memorize most of their pieces and stop using the music often do not develop good reading skill because they don't practice it enough. Every time one plays from the music one is practicing their reading skill. Aural skill and the many other skills is a separate issue.
are you saying that people who memorize music don't read music? I think I know what type you are: the one who is afraid of people not playing music from sheet music.
I have met people who think playing by ear is a bad thing as the only things that is ok is playing from sheet music. What you are reffering to is playing from sheet music but memorizing music so you don't have to rely on only using the sheet music. It's not like we are talking about not suing sheet music at all.
If you only focus on lead sheets you will never learn to read sheetmusic that well and that isn't very good I think. But you also need to play from leadsheets sometimes. Or play from memory.
I say: the more skills you have the better you will be at playing the piano.
No one would say your last sentence is not true but your comment about what type of person I am is 100% wrong.

The OP's post is about playing and practicing a piece that has a fully realized score and has nothing to do with playing from a lead sheet or playing pop music by ear. They asked if it was better to always memorize a piece a measure or phrase at a time or play with the score. My comment(and the comment of other posters before me who said the same thing) was that it's better to play mostly from the score because those who try to memorize every piece and stop using the score quickly often never learn to sight read or read music well. There have been many PW threads where the poster has this problem for that reason. It's pretty obvious that every time one plays with the score one is practicing reading or sight reading music, and the more one does that the better one gets at it.
my point was that many people get stuck with only using sheet music. I hear people saying that they cannot play unless they have a sheet music in front of them. That's also problematic. We ned both skills. That was my point. Lead sheets are in fact something that has what to play written in it. It's just that it doesn't tell you everything. You would still have that question: should I memorize or or just play a prima vista?


we need boogie woogie and Mozart. We need Mozart playing boogie woogie.
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 10,863
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 10,863
@Dan
Since you are a Mozart fan, do you think you could play Mozart well from a lead sheet?


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It's ok to be a Work In Progress
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 2,794
G

Platinum Supporter until July 22 2014
2000 Post Club Member
Offline

Platinum Supporter until July 22 2014
2000 Post Club Member
G
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 2,794
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
Originally Posted by Greener
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
Well, playing by ear is often neglected I have to say. At least, in what we refer to as "classical" piano lessons.

In fairness though, learning and playing classical is not well suited to learning to play by ear. But, that doesn't mean you can't still develop your ear through playing classical. When you need to recall something, what it sounds like is a good reminder and develops your ear. So, this is where memorizing can really help strengthen that aspect of your playing.

But again, it shouldn't come down to, which is better or more important.

Reading should be the focus of classical, but not the only focus, of course.
I don't really think "classical" vs "non-classical". I might use more sheet music for some music more than others but I might still use playing by ear even if it is a "classical" piece. You are not forced to play a piece onky by using sheet music. You can make up your own arrangements or learn a melody by ear.

Why not?

Just don't try out for any Chopin competitions. You will be slaughtered.

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,650
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,650
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
There are many, many skills that need developing to play the piano well. The point of the post you quoted was that those who memorize most of their pieces and stop using the music often do not develop good reading skill because they don't practice it enough. Every time one plays from the music one is practicing their reading skill. Aural skill and the many other skills is a separate issue.
are you saying that people who memorize music don't read music? I think I know what type you are: the one who is afraid of people not playing music from sheet music.
I have met people who think playing by ear is a bad thing as the only things that is ok is playing from sheet music. What you are reffering to is playing from sheet music but memorizing music so you don't have to rely on only using the sheet music. It's not like we are talking about not suing sheet music at all.
If you only focus on lead sheets you will never learn to read sheetmusic that well and that isn't very good I think. But you also need to play from leadsheets sometimes. Or play from memory.
I say: the more skills you have the better you will be at playing the piano.
No one would say your last sentence is not true but your comment about what type of person I am is 100% wrong.

The OP's post is about playing and practicing a piece that has a fully realized score and has nothing to do with playing from a lead sheet or playing pop music by ear. They asked if it was better to always memorize a piece a measure or phrase at a time or play with the score. My comment(and the comment of other posters before me who said the same thing) was that it's better to play mostly from the score because those who try to memorize every piece and stop using the score quickly often never learn to sight read or read music well. There have been many PW threads where the poster has this problem for that reason. It's pretty obvious that every time one plays with the score one is practicing reading or sight reading music, and the more one does that the better one gets at it.
my point was that many people get stuck with only using sheet music. I hear people saying that they cannot play unless they have a sheet music in front of them. That's also problematic. We need both skills. That was my point. Lead sheets are in fact something that has what to play written in it. It's just that it doesn't tell you everything. You would still have that question: should I memorize or or just play a prima vista?
If someone wants to play only classical or play non-classical music that has a complete score, not being able to play by ear is not a problem.Those people don't "get stuck" because they use the score unless they choose to memorize a piece. Classical music is not played by ear by 99+% of pianists since it is usually too complicated to play by ear, and it would take MUCH longer to learn even if one could play it by ear. Lead sheets have nothing to do with the OP's question which was about learning music that has a fully realized score. Finally, when playing classical or any kind of music that has a fully realized score, the choice is definitely not between memorizing and sight reading as you say.

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,592
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,592
Originally Posted by Dantheboogieguy
I don't really think "classical" vs "non-classical". I might use more sheet music for some music more than others but I might still use playing by ear even if it is a "classical" piece. You are not forced to play a piece onky by using sheet music. You can make up your own arrangements or learn a melody by ear.
You can certainly play Für Elise (and Rondo alla turca, and a lot else) by ear, or from a lead sheet wink . As long as you're not banking on actually playing all the right notes.

I did once play it by ear, on an Alaskan ferry ship's bar upright, but my audience were all inebriated (I wasn't, of course, and in full possession of all my faculties whistle), and I improvised quite a bit of the 'in-between Rondo theme' sections, because I couldn't quite remember how they sounded - well, I'd avoided listening to it ever since I was a kid, because our neighbor's son rattled through it presto con malizia e senza espressione daily for several months, by which time I couldn't stand it any more. Still, my deranged version was a resounding success with the drinking punters, judging by the applause grin.

However, I did hear a version by a professional jazz pianist (on a cruise ship) a few years ago, who played from the full score on his iPad, but using it as a lead sheet, swinging it as well as changing the rhythm. I asked to see his score, and saw that though the actual notes looked like unadulterated Beethoven, there were also chord symbols above the melody. He simply played the RH melody (but not in strict time) and improvised the rest based on the given chord symbols, ignoring the LH part in the score completely.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 984
C
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
C
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 984
When you already have a piece memorized, playing without the score allows you to have undivided focus on the sound you are producing and you don't have to worry about page turns.

That said, there are times when it is customary to play from the score, for example when you are accompanying (and usually someone would do the page turning for you).


A rising tide lifts all the boats
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
Piano Buyer - Read the Articles, Explore the website
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
PTG search is unavailable?
by ebonyk - 06/27/22 10:13 AM
Circle of fifths/ circle of fourths
by Wayne2467 - 06/27/22 10:05 AM
20 min. piano piece for competition
by lilys7 - 06/27/22 09:58 AM
Owner manual for Technics PR 170
by neville - 06/26/22 09:14 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
What's Hot!!
FREE June Newsletter is Here!
--------------------
Forums RULES, Terms of Service & HELP
(updated 06/06/2022)
-------------------
Music Store Going Out of Business Sale!
---------------------
Mr. PianoWorld's Original Composition
---------------------
Sell Your Piano on our world famous Piano Forums!
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums43
Topics213,687
Posts3,203,597
Members105,655
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2022 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5