2022 our 25th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
60 members (anotherscott, 5stringbanjo, Bostonmoores, BillBlackwell, AndreaH, astrotoy, BMKE, bob@pei, 12 invisible), 2,176 guests, and 249 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
#3176818 12/11/21 12:59 PM
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 44
N
N Artur Online Content OP
Full Member
OP Online Content
Full Member
N
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 44
So after absence of playing for a few decades, I am working on getting a grand piano. I have a too old console but I can play it at least until the grand arrives.
I know some pieces from high school and college conservatory days.
My question is how do I get my skills back other than just relearning old pieces. I would like to get back to sight reading and then really learning pieces. How do I relearn technique, touch, speed etc ? Would appreciate your thoughts? Life is too busy to have a fixed lesson time and not sure that is best approach. Should have done this long ago but I am just going to look forward and not back.

Joined: May 2018
Posts: 1,608
L
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 1,608
Just start and find out what works, you have changed a lot in 20+ years so everything will be unknown territory.

Most importantly is motivation and time spend practicing (the right way.)

Remember that it will be a marathon and not a sprint. Progress will come quick and then seems to stall out for weeks or even month at a time.

If you don't succeed on your own, a teacher might be able to help you.

Good luck


When you play, never mind who listens to you. R.Schumann.

Casio GP-400

2006 August Förster 215
Joined: Oct 2021
Posts: 358
A
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
A
Joined: Oct 2021
Posts: 358
Damn druids!

Joined: May 2005
Posts: 12,177

Platinum Supporter until November 30 2022
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content

Platinum Supporter until November 30 2022
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 12,177
First of all, the experience of playing music on the grand will hopefully be different than on your current old console.

I was in your same situation about 20 years ago. Had an older studio upright that I played from time to time over the years, but when I purchased a baby grand a new world of music making opened up to me.

However, rather than initially tackling "big" pieces from my university days, I focused on learning smaller, stylistically varied beginning/intermediate level works (two to four minutes in duration) with the goal of paying attention to details (fingering, touch, phrasing, dynamics, etc.) , and playing them as well as I could. Exploring a lot of new repertoire (rather than simply relearning pieces I played in the past) helped refresh my sight reading skills as well.


Mason and Hamlin BB - 91640
Kawai K-500 Upright
Kawai CA-65 Digital
Korg SP-100 Stage Piano
YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/pianophilo
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 2,535
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 2,535
Originally Posted by N Artur
My question is how do I get my skills back other than just relearning old pieces. I would like to get back to sight reading and then really learning pieces. How do I relearn technique, touch, speed etc ? Would appreciate your thoughts?

My thoughts are that you start with pieces that you would like to play. Not your old pieces, but new ones. Find the scores, and start with one that looks quite a bit easier than what you could play when you stopped playing. What is its key? Practise its scale (just this one), find the tonic triad and its inversions, which is the subdominant, the dominant. Play the arpeggios. Now start practising your piece. You will probably find quite a few things difficult. Focus on those difficult spots, and give yourself the time that is needed to overcome those difficulties. A lot of things will come back to you, and a few things you will need to relearn.

Alternatively, find a piece that you want to play that has a free youtube tutorial. Now most youtube tutorials are not really tutorials, they are demonstrations in a slow tempo, but there are also true tutorials. Follow a couple of these tutorials.

Good luck, and I hope you'll enjoy the process!


Playing the piano is learning to create, playfully and deeply seriously, our own music in the world.
*
... feeling like the pianist on the Titanic ...
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 2,571
T
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
T
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 2,571
I started off with mainly Classical pieces, especially the music of Bach. I enjoyed listening to the complex harmonies in my school days. I still play a lot of Bach but added other composers & Jazz arrangements into my repertoire after getting a teacher.

People who took lessons have enough basic reading to learn pieces on their own. I download sheet music including Classical, Jazz & Pop tunes regularly. The last piece I downloaded was John Lennon "Imagine". Before that was an arrangement of the Shostakovich Waltz #2 after hearing an orchestral recording on radio. My first download was "Rainbow Connection" from the Muppets movie. You can go back to pieces you played from your school days and look around to find other pieces you may be interested in learning. In my school days I did a class presentation on the composer J.S. Bach in music class. I used a harpsichord recording of the French Suite #3 for demo. I enjoyed listening to the piece but thought it was too technical for me to learn. 2 decades later I downloaded the score and started learning it. Another piece I listened to was the Pachelbel Canon in D. There are different piano arrangements you can download.

The other thing I do regularly is to listen to student performances online (some posted by their teachers in a music studio) to hear what people at different levels are playing. I can get some idea the pieces I would like to learn. I also follow teachers who posts tutorials on YouTube regularly.

In my school days my main instrument was violin. The piano pieces I learned over the years including Bach fugues, Schubert "Ave Maria", movements out of Beethoven Sonatas were new pieces. I'd pick pieces because I like the music, not because my teacher thinks they're appropriate for my level. You can find easy arrangements of pieces you want to learn online if the original is too technical.

Good luck...

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,592
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,592
Originally Posted by N Artur
So after absence of playing for a few decades, I am working on getting a grand piano. I have a too old console but I can play it at least until the grand arrives.
I know some pieces from high school and college conservatory days.
My question is how do I get my skills back other than just relearning old pieces. I would like to get back to sight reading and then really learning pieces. How do I relearn technique, touch, speed etc ?
If you got to advanced classical level before you stopped, you should have no problem getting back to your previous level - eventually - and then building on from there, to new heights (if you practice with intent).

How do I know? Because I've been there - I stopped piano almost completely when my university course (unrelated to music) took up all my time, and I had no access to any piano after that, moving around with my job.....apart from the odd encounter (public pianos in train stations, airports, shopping malls, town halls, and occasional forays into piano showrooms.....you get the picture), and a short period when I was working in a place which had an upright, until - several decades later - I finally settled down with my job and bought my own piano in 2010.

It only took a few months of daily practicing (on old, favorite pieces, plus a few new ones) to get back to my former level, and then I realized that I could get better, even at my advanced age. So, I started working on pieces that I used to think were completely beyond me, and discovered that - with assiduous practicing - when an irresistible force met an immovable object, the object moved cool. Nothing ventured, nothing gained; never say never, etc, etc. I had stacks of long-forgotten old sheet music dating back to my student days, which I used for sight-reading whenever I felt like it, not to mention volumes of piano music of all sorts (sonatas, fantasias, variations, etudes, short pieces etc) by all the great composers, and of course these days you can just download almost anything for free from IMSLP. Why not try a composer you've never played before? - etc.

When I started doing a monthly piano recital a couple of years later, I met a few lapsed pianists who asked me the same question as you: how do I get my piano skills back, after so many years? And by following their progress over the years, I found that the higher the standard you reached when you left off, the easier it is to regain all your former skills, and more. But if you were less than advanced when you stopped, you'd definitely benefit from having a good teacher to help you - even if just a few lessons to get you restarted on the right track, or a lesson once a fortnight.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,658
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,658
Originally Posted by bennevis
If you got to advanced classical level before you stopped, you should have no problem getting back to your previous level - eventually - and then building on from there, to new heights (if you practice with intent).
I agree with this. One doesn't forget how to play the piano so I think with not too much time/practice you will regain your former skills.

Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 44
N
N Artur Online Content OP
Full Member
OP Online Content
Full Member
N
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 44
Thank you. Much wisdom shared. I appreciate it


Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
Piano Buyer - Read the Articles, Explore the website
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Alternatives to MainStage for Live Performances?
by Gord Webster - 06/28/22 11:29 PM
MSRPs, Margins, Price Matching, DP Retailers
by bob@pei - 06/28/22 10:17 PM
Philadelphia International Music Festival faculty recital
by Rich Galassini - 06/28/22 05:46 PM
Piano Movers in the North-East
by PassingBy - 06/28/22 01:22 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
What's Hot!!
FREE June Newsletter is Here!
--------------------
Forums RULES, Terms of Service & HELP
(updated 06/06/2022)
-------------------
Music Store Going Out of Business Sale!
---------------------
Mr. PianoWorld's Original Composition
---------------------
Sell Your Piano on our world famous Piano Forums!
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums43
Topics213,714
Posts3,204,034
Members105,669
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2022 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5