2022 our 25th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
47 members (BlackKnight, bwv872, 36251, Dore, Boboulus, anotherscott, DigitalSpace, 12 invisible), 766 guests, and 279 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 2 of 3 1 2 3
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
Originally Posted by Ben_NZ
Originally Posted by LarryK
I never felt so good in my life as when all of the ugly vinyl siding and old cedar was ripped off of my old house.
I was relieved after I had the original concrete roof tiles taken off my 1950 house. They were developing holes due the concrete dissolving (which I would 'fix' by injecting sealant), and they would slide out from the apex of the roof in high winds. eek

As for windows, I wanted to retrofit double glazing into my wooden frames for sound insulation, but I was told I'd have to add extra hinges to take the weight, and switch to fake muntin thingies due to the glass thickness. It was also going to be challenging to retain my leadlights:
copy and paste this link to bypass the remote linking restriction of my free hosting provider
So I kept the windows unchanged, fitted draught sealer and had some very heavy curtains made up. This helps with piano acoustics too. thumb

I pitched the idea of replacing our single pane windows with single pane windows but my wife would not hear of it, and, I can't blame her. Now that I had all of the storms pulled off by the roofing and siding guys, we are facing the winter behind single pane windows. It's not fun. I had a window installer, and he ghosted me after one year of discussions. Talk about disappointing. It seems difficult to get finish carpenters these days. I could probably do it myself, hammering off the inner stop, taking out the bottom sash. pulling out the middle stop, removing the top sash, and then reversing the procedure but I'd rather have someone who has done it before.

The sashes are basically drop-in replacements. The manufacturer includes stainless steel springs to hold the windows at any level so you don't have to re-weight all of the windows.

It is difficult to retain historic windows or replace them with something that looks that same. I looked low and high.

All I know is that all houses deteriorate and that maintenance is important. Sorry to hear about your roof. Around here, they put InsulBrick as siding on some houses. The stuff looks like asphalt shingles with a brick pattern. It breaks down in a particularly ugly way. I'm willing to paint my wooden window sills and I will have the cedar re-stained in perhaps 10-15 years.

Last edited by LarryK; 12/17/21 10:04 PM.
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 1,851
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 1,851
Originally Posted by tre corda
Originally Posted by Keith D Kerman
To me the real question is aluminum or aluminium. I greatly prefer the latter but as an American who is already trying not to seem a pretentious tool, I can't get away with the aluminium pronunciation.

Me too, we have aluminum roof tiles, can anyone beat that!
Mind you, moss will even grow in between those too, so you do have to use a power hose occasionally. I would bother more about insulating the room and making it as comfortable as possible than what is historically correct or even what is perfectly beautyful.The main thing is to protect your piano from an unstable humidity.
I was told by my husband that no moss grows between the aluminum tiles and its just sap from a tree so no power hose is needed, just a garden hose.By the way our window frames are made of pvc.


My piano's voice is my voice to God and the great unknown universe, and to those I love.In other words a hymn.That is all, but that is enough.Life goes on, despite pain and fear.Music is beautiful,life is beautiful.


Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
Originally Posted by tre corda
Originally Posted by tre corda
Originally Posted by Keith D Kerman
To me the real question is aluminum or aluminium. I greatly prefer the latter but as an American who is already trying not to seem a pretentious tool, I can't get away with the aluminium pronunciation.

Me too, we have aluminum roof tiles, can anyone beat that!
Mind you, moss will even grow in between those too, so you do have to use a power hose occasionally. I would bother more about insulating the room and making it as comfortable as possible than what is historically correct or even what is perfectly beautyful.The main thing is to protect your piano from an unstable humidity.
I was told by my husband that no moss grows between the aluminum tiles and its just sap from a tree so no power hose is needed, just a garden hose.By the way our window frames are made of pvc.

I’ve actually never heard of aluminum roof tiles. Could you tell me in what countries they’re installed? How long do they last? My experience with aluminum in the US is with gutters, where the material is made into low quality gutters that crack, dent, deteriorate quickly.

My idea of European roof materials is lead and slate in England, zinc in France, and terra cotta tiles in Germany. Over 80% of roofs in Paris are still made of zinc, most of them are over 150 years old.

Zinc gives Paris its gray patina. Hausmann mandated zinc when the city was expanded in the 1800s. Zinc can be molded into curved shapes and zinc forms a protective coating when damaged, like copper. Our zinc gutters are a nod to my wife’s French roots. The gutters will last a long time and they carry a lot of water.

I’d love to have a slate roof but my framing will not support it and it was not used in the 1920s. They used hard asphalt shingles which did not last long. I’d have loved a zinc roof but that would have doubled the cost of the project.

Here are before and after pictures of our modest three bedroom, one bath house, designed and built by a guy named Hulley. Hulley built over 700 houses like this one in Pittsburgh. The design is Craftsman-like and is a reaction against the large Victorian houses, which required servants run.

This house is manageable for a couple to run. It’s not too much, it’s just enough. After twenty years of living in one bedroom apartments, my wife and I have spread out. We each have our own offices, hers in the dormer, which she loves, as it reminds her of Parisian garrett apartments.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Last edited by LarryK; 12/18/21 06:30 AM.
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 1,851
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 1,851
Larry
They were on the house we have just moved into.The roof is fine, no leaks! Here is an example of a firm that sells them.
https://www.classicmetalroofingsystems.com/

Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
Originally Posted by tre corda
Larry
They were on the house we have just moved into.The roof is fine, no leaks! Here is an example of a firm that sells them.
https://www.classicmetalroofingsystems.com/

Yeah, I see. Aluminum roofs are not that common in the US. I am against the idea of putting metal roofs on top of an asphalt shingle roof, which people do. You wind up trapping moisture in the asphalt shingles and not addressing the rot problems.

After coming through the Hurricane Ida with just the tar membrane on the roof, no asphalt shingles, I realized that the asphalt shingles just protect the membrane from deteriorating from sun, and aren’t that important.

More important is the flashing, the installation of which is an art. My guys bent leaded copper for the roof edges, valleys, all the places water can get in. The flashing does a lot to prevent leaks.

In order to protect a house, you have to get as much water off of it as quickly as possible. I feel I’ve achieved that. The downspouts from above are piped directly into the gutters, so as to prevent water from cascading down the shingles from a downspout, which causes moisture and rot problems. We get a lot of rain so it’s important.

Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 15,030
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 15,030
Originally Posted by tre corda
Larry
They were on the house we have just moved into.The roof is fine, no leaks! Here is an example of a firm that sells them.
https://www.classicmetalroofingsystems.com/

I have aluminum roof panels on a couple of my barns/sheds. They've held up well over the years, and were installed back in the late 1970s/early 1980s. A little dirty and discolored from tree sap, as tre corda mentioned, but haven't rotted, rusted or deteriorated.

So, I'd think the aluminum roof panels are a good material for roofs. May get dinged more easily during a hail storm, but other roofing materials would be damaged in a hail storm as well.

I re-roofed my house about 4 years ago, and did some research on metal roofs vs. asphalt shingle roofs. The metal roofs are becoming more and more popular, and no doubt a great option. But I've seen a lot of houses with metal roofs where the paint on the roofing panels had faded, and it just looked unsightly to me. So, I went with the high quality architectural style asphalt roofing shingles. I love the looks of my roof, and no leaks whatsoever. However, the metal roofs have a longer warranty, I believe. But when we are talking 20 years for asphalt shingles, I may not be around another 20 years. So, I'll enjoy my roof one day at a time. smile

As for the original question of selecting aluminum windows or PVC, I think it is a matter of preference, and an argument can be made for the benefits, pros and cons of each type.

As for the vinyl/PVC windows causing cancer, from what I've read, this is a possibility in the manufacturing plants where they are produce, but I doubt one would get cancer by installing a vinyl/PVC window, standing and looking out the window, or cleaning the window glass with Windex, any more than they would get cancer based on their biological DNA. Just my opinion.

Rick


Piano enthusiast and amateur musician: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated". Yamaha C7. YouTube Channel
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
Originally Posted by Rickster
Originally Posted by tre corda
Larry
They were on the house we have just moved into.The roof is fine, no leaks! Here is an example of a firm that sells them.
https://www.classicmetalroofingsystems.com/

I have aluminum roof panels on a couple of my barns/sheds. They've held up well over the years, and were installed back in the late 1970s/early 1980s. A little dirty and discolored from tree sap, as tre corda mentioned, but haven't rotted, rusted or deteriorated.

So, I'd think the aluminum roof panels are a good material for roofs. May get dinged more easily during a hail storm, but other roofing materials would be damaged in a hail storm as well.

I re-roofed my house about 4 years ago, and did some research on metal roofs vs. asphalt shingle roofs. The metal roofs are becoming more and more popular, and no doubt a great option. But I've seen a lot of houses with metal roofs where the paint on the roofing panels had faded, and it just looked unsightly to me. So, I went with the high quality architectural style asphalt roofing shingles. I love the looks of my roof, and no leaks whatsoever. However, the metal roofs have a longer warranty, I believe. But when we are talking 20 years for asphalt shingles, I may not be around another 20 years. So, I'll enjoy my roof one day at a time. smile

As for the original question of selecting aluminum windows or PVC, I think it is a matter of preference, and an argument can be made for the benefits, pros and cons of each type.

As for the vinyl/PVC windows causing cancer, from what I've read, this is a possibility in the manufacturing plants where they are produce, but I doubt one would get cancer by installing a vinyl/PVC window, standing and looking out the window, or cleaning the window glass with Windex, any more than they would get cancer based on their biological DNA. Just my opinion.

Rick


To renovate a house is to wrestle with one's own mortality. My roofer told me that his slate roofs would last four hundred years. I said, Bill, where am I going to be in four hundred years?

Still, I believe in trying to do the right thing, as I see fit.

Like you, Rick, I've seen a lot of ugly metal roofs. Don't they put them on Red Roof Inns or Taco Bells? I couldn't live with the colors they have for them. Besides, I would worry about rust on all of the parts that are used to attach the aluminum panels.

I also went with an architectural shingle. I know that shingles contribute immensely to garbage in landfills, but I didn't see any really good options. Maybe I should have sprung for a standing seam zinc roof, but the cost would have been high.

https://www.remodelingcosts.org/zinc-roof-costs-and-pros-and-cons/

As for windows, wood windows can easily last 100 years if you keep the water off of them. My wood windows are one hundred years old. I have yet to see a vinyl window that is not somehow broken in the space of ten or twenty years, or discolored or faded. The latches break, the sun deteriorates the plastic, the tilt-in feature stops working. I guess I'm not a fan of aluminum windows either. I suppose they strike me as being rather commercial in appearance.

As for causing cancer, here is a story for you. So, when I was trying to find someone to put up new cedar siding shingles, and having a hard time, I talked to a guy who ran three Amish crews who would only put up Hardie board siding. Hardie board is made from cement bonded with fibers, requires diamond blades to cut it, and absolutely causes cancer when you breath the dust. Somehow, these Amish guys, traditionalists, you would think, would not cut a cedar shingle with a knife, and would instead work with a cancer causing concrete product! I could only shake my head at the whole thing.

I got told over and over that the Hardie board looked like wood but it did not look like wood to me. It just looked awful, too uniform. Maybe it would withstand a missile attack, but how likely is that?

Last edited by LarryK; 12/18/21 12:15 PM.
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 1,851
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 1,851
Gee and I thought we had the best roof in the whole street!
They are a dark, colour and look wonderful and by the time the nuts and bolts are rusted we will be no doubt be gone too.(or we could use our savings and buy more aluminum roof tiles. What was this thread about again? 😀

By the way the previous owner got a 50 year warranty on the roof!

Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
Originally Posted by tre corda
Gee and I thought we had the best roof in the whole street!
They are a dark, colour and look wonderful and by the time the nuts and bolts are rusted we will be no doubt be gone too.(or we could use our savings and buy more aluminum roof tiles. What was this thread about again? 😀

By the way the previous owner got a 50 year warranty on the roof!

I don’t put any faith in warranties, I honestly don’t. Has anybody gotten anything fixed with one of those fifty year warranties? I feel warranties are sales gimmicks.

There are no warranties on Hausmann’s 150 year old zinc roofs, in Paris, but most of them are standing up fine.

We were talking about windows. I like natural materials, less so composites. I suppose I could like a metal roof but what about the noise from rain?

Yeah, mortality, we’re all going, but, for some reason, I can’t let the house rot before I do. Many of my neighbors don’t seem to care. You have to fight to hold onto a house, otherwise the carpenter ants and termites will take it, if the house is made of wood.

I have a lot of respect for the old captains of industry. They built beautiful homes, with stained glass, exquisite woodworking, and they didn’t live long either.

Mark Twain had a beautiful house built in Hartford, Connecticut, and complained of the cost of the project. But, when it was done, he wrote:

"To us our house was not unsentient matter--it had a heart & a soul & eyes to see us with, & approvals & solicitudes & deep sympathies; it was of us, & we were in its confidence, & lived in its grace & in the peace of its benediction. We never came home from an absence that its face did not light up & speak out its eloquent welcome--& we could not enter it unmoved." - Mark Twain, describing the Hartford house in a letter to his friend, Joe Twichell

Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,506
J
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,506
I'm reading everyone's comments here with interest.

Ubu: Regarding aluminum vs pvc windows, you most likely already know this, but I'll add this info as I don't think anyone's mentioned it yet - that aluminum conducts heat and cold and is more prone to condensation and of course are cold to the touch in winter.

Larry K: Regarding the thickness of the muntin bars, I'm not sure if we're both on the same page, so to speak, when talking about the dimensions of muntin bars. When I was talking about the width of muntin bars, I was referring to how wide they look, from left to right, when standing in front of the window. When you refer to the muntin bars thickness, are you referring to this or to the depth of the bars from the front to the rear of the window?.......Those Heirloom windows do look good. Thank you for bringing those to our attention.......And thanks also for posting Mark Twain's words about his house. That is beautiful.

Jeanne W


Music is about the heart and so should a piano be about the heart. - Pique

1920 Steinway A3
My Piano Delivery Thread:
http://www.pianoworld.com/ubb/ubb/ultimatebb.php?/topic/1/8776.html#000000
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 1,851
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 1,851
As it has been mentioned already it all depends on how you pronounce the word- "aluminum" or "aluminium".🙄 Perhaps aluminium makes me seem more "posh".Still at least I will not have to worry about my husband falling off the roof every few years because he would have to replace rotted shingles which are covered in moss.I am sure Mr Twain would understand too,
despite his philosophy of beauty.

I mean let's face it he did write Huckleberry Finn!

Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 295
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 295
Originally Posted by Jeanne W
Larry K: Regarding the thickness of the muntin bars.....
..... are you referring to [how wide they look, from left to right] or to the depth of the bars from the front to the rear of the window?
I realise you directed this at Larry, but I think I had a similar dilemma. Have a look at this picture by copying the link address and pasting it into your browser (clicking on the link won't work): http://mopro.tripod.com/beam.jpg
In the photo, I had started making the first of three leadlights to go in the top areas of each section of this window, copying the design which is used elsewhere in the house. I then decided to investigate double glazing. For this particular window, that would have required encasing my leadlight panels in triple-glazing sandwiches, separate from the double-glazing units required for the main portion of each section of the window. I would have needed to increase the thickness of the wooden dividers (muntin bars?) to support it all. I've indicated this with some digital scribbling below the leadlight panel.
If the leadlight panel wasn't there, the whole window could be one big double-glazing unit with a fake cosmetic muntin bar stuck over the top to create the illusion of separate upper and lower sections. Obviously the muntin bar could stay skinny in this scenario, but then its illusion might be less effective when viewed from certain angles.
Happily, the bus route was moved to a different street, solving my problem. thumb

Regarding PVC windows, I looked at some when I was having a window added to my house, and I was tempted by how well they sealed and how little noise they let through compared to my thin single-glazed windows from 1950. For visual reasons, I ended up going with a second-hand wooden window from a demolition yard, and now that you're all talking about PVC's downsides, I don't regret my choice. smile


2014 Kawai K-500
1920s Sir Herbert Marshall Sons & Rose upright
Kurzweil PC3LE8 stage piano with Pianoteq 7
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
Originally Posted by Jeanne W
I'm reading everyone's comments here with interest.

Ubu: Regarding aluminum vs pvc windows, you most likely already know this, but I'll add this info as I don't think anyone's mentioned it yet - that aluminum conducts heat and cold and is more prone to condensation and of course are cold to the touch in winter.

Larry K: Regarding the thickness of the muntin bars, I'm not sure if we're both on the same page, so to speak, when talking about the dimensions of muntin bars. When I was talking about the width of muntin bars, I was referring to how wide they look, from left to right, when standing in front of the window. When you refer to the muntin bars thickness, are you referring to this or to the depth of the bars from the front to the rear of the window?.......Those Heirloom windows do look good. Thank you for bringing those to our attention.......And thanks also for posting Mark Twain's words about his house. That is beautiful.

Jeanne W

Sorry for the confusion. I mean width, which is 3/4” at the base and much narrower at the top, the muntins have a profile.

The depth of the muntins is also an issue, as that I believe is close to one inch in my old windows, and many other historic windows.

These dimensions matter to the eye and are what give the windows a sense of depth. The modern designs have muntins that are at least 1 1/4” wide, and much less deep, they’re limited by the depth of a standard insulated double pane glass panel.

For those who are not aware, the muntins are the vertical pieces pieces of wood that traditionally separated glass panes and are on the inside of the windows. Glass was expensive and could not be made in large pieces so muntins were developed.

On the outside of the window, the thin lines are called glazing bars, it is where the putty was placed to hold the panes.

Now, technology has advanced and we can make huge panes of double insulated glass. To me, these big windows give old houses a blank look. They weren’t like that originally, the muntins are a design element that adds visual interest to a house. The muntins also break up the view from the inside.

Now, modern manufacturers stick muntins between the glass panes, and they use very thin ones on the outside, and to me, they don’t look right and I can easily tell from the street that they’re modern windows.

As for mold growing on asphalt shingles, many materials are biocides. Zinc is a biocide. So is stainless steel. Copper too, I think. The water running off of these materials will inhibit moss growth.

You don’t get moss if you move the water off of your roof with good quality gutters and don’t let gutters concentrate streams of water on your roof. Also, houses that are heavily shaded by trees tend not to dry out and show more moss problems than houses that are not shaded. I can post pictures.

Water is very destructive, it will destroy any material. The question is time.

Last edited by LarryK; 12/19/21 06:05 AM.
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
Here is an example of one of my five over one windows that shows the muntins on top. They’re very thin and very deep.

By the way, five windows on my first floor have been painted and nailed shut, and have been for decades. It is maddening. I tried to free one but it is for file, and, besides, we decided single pane windows were not going to cut it in the winter.

[Linked Image]

Last edited by LarryK; 12/19/21 06:11 AM.
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
Originally Posted by Ben_NZ
Originally Posted by Jeanne W
Larry K: Regarding the thickness of the muntin bars.....
..... are you referring to [how wide they look, from left to right] or to the depth of the bars from the front to the rear of the window?
I realise you directed this at Larry, but I think I had a similar dilemma. Have a look at this picture by copying the link address and pasting it into your browser (clicking on the link won't work): http://mopro.tripod.com/beam.jpg
In the photo, I had started making the first of three leadlights to go in the top areas of each section of this window, copying the design which is used elsewhere in the house. I then decided to investigate double glazing. For this particular window, that would have required encasing my leadlight panels in triple-glazing sandwiches, separate from the double-glazing units required for the main portion of each section of the window. I would have needed to increase the thickness of the wooden dividers (muntin bars?) to support it all. I've indicated this with some digital scribbling below the leadlight panel.
If the leadlight panel wasn't there, the whole window could be one big double-glazing unit with a fake cosmetic muntin bar stuck over the top to create the illusion of separate upper and lower sections. Obviously the muntin bar could stay skinny in this scenario, but then its illusion might be less effective when viewed from certain angles.
Happily, the bus route was moved to a different street, solving my problem. thumb

Regarding PVC windows, I looked at some when I was having a window added to my house, and I was tempted by how well they sealed and how little noise they let through compared to my thin single-glazed windows from 1950. For visual reasons, I ended up going with a second-hand wooden window from a demolition yard, and now that you're all talking about PVC's downsides, I don't regret my choice. smile

I am unable to see your pictures. Can you post on Imgur and Copy the Post Link?

Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
The website for Mark Twain’s house:

https://marktwainhouse.org/

Huckleberry Finn is a cornerstone of American literature.

I can’t say as I like the current windows in Twain’s house. I find it hard to believe they’re like the originals.

Twain’s house has stained glass by Tiffany! And, what amazing brick, slate, and stick work! Unbelievably, it was a rooming house through the 1960s. It takes a lot of money to maintain a large house.

We have two original stained glass windows.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Here are some window designs that Bill at Heirloom has been working on this year.

[Linked Image]

There are some people who will not accept what the big window manufacturers provide and so, we go another route, although there is a wait.

Last edited by LarryK; 12/19/21 06:32 AM.
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 15,030
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 15,030
Originally Posted by LarryK
The website for Mark Twain’s house:

https://marktwainhouse.org/

Huckleberry Finn is a cornerstone of American literature.

I can’t say as I like the current windows in Twain’s house. I find it hard to believe they’re like the originals.

Twain’s house has stained glass by Tiffany! And, what amazing brick, slate, and stick work! Unbelievably, it was a rooming house through the 1960s. It takes a lot of money to maintain a large house.

We have two original stained glass windows.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Here are some window designs that Bill at Heirloom has been working on this year.

[Linked Image]

There are some people who will not accept what the big window manufacturers provide and so, we go another route, although there is a wait.

Love the stained glass window, Larry!

My late wife bought an old, stained glass panel at a flee market years ago, and wanted me to install it in our front door. So, I installed it in our front door. smile

My older brother, who lives in Ohio, bought and renovated an old farm house from the late 1800s and he has lots of stained glass panels/windows in numerous locations.

Also, your house is lovely and looks like a beautiful home! I also love your replacement windows! smile

Rick


Piano enthusiast and amateur musician: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated". Yamaha C7. YouTube Channel
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
Originally Posted by Rickster
Originally Posted by LarryK
The website for Mark Twain’s house:

https://marktwainhouse.org/

Huckleberry Finn is a cornerstone of American literature.

I can’t say as I like the current windows in Twain’s house. I find it hard to believe they’re like the originals.

Twain’s house has stained glass by Tiffany! And, what amazing brick, slate, and stick work! Unbelievably, it was a rooming house through the 1960s. It takes a lot of money to maintain a large house.

We have two original stained glass windows.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Here are some window designs that Bill at Heirloom has been working on this year.

[Linked Image]

There are some people who will not accept what the big window manufacturers provide and so, we go another route, although there is a wait.

Love the stained glass window, Larry!

My late wife bought an old, stained glass panel at a flee market years ago, and wanted me to install it in our front door. So, I installed it in our front door. smile

My older brother, who lives in Ohio, bought and renovated an old farm house from the late 1800s and he has lots of stained glass panels/windows in numerous locations.

Also, your house is lovely and looks like a beautiful home! I also love your replacement windows! smile

Rick

Hello Rick,

Thank you for your kind words, they are much appreciated.

We love stained glass windows, and would have bought a Victorian house just to have large, stained glass windows, but then we would have had to renovate, maintain, and heat a much larger home.

This little house is the right size for us. We use all the rooms, no space is wasted.

Bill Hepburn of Heirloom Windows started his window company because he could not find any good replica windows to replace the ones in his own farmhouse, in Crawfordsville, Indiana.

Bill’s Facebook page has posts on all of the cool windows he’s building:

https://m.facebook.com/HeirloomWindows

Our replicas will look great when we get them installed in the spring!

We also have to replace our doors.

Last edited by LarryK; 12/19/21 10:44 AM.
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,506
J
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,506
Larry:

I agree with Rickster, your stained glass windows are beautiful.

And your comments about huge panes of double insulated glass…

"Now, technology has advanced and we can make huge panes of double insulated glass. To me, these big windows give old houses a blank look. They weren’t like that originally, the muntins are a design element that adds visual interest to a house. The muntins also break up the view from the inside."

…rang true with me.

One of the New England style wood siding houses in my neighborhood has been renovated. The house looks good in general, but whoever did the renovation removed the original historic windows that had smaller panes of glass and wooden muntins and replaced them with windows that each consist of one huge pane of glass.

The house appears to have lost its soul.

Sad.

Jeanne W


Music is about the heart and so should a piano be about the heart. - Pique

1920 Steinway A3
My Piano Delivery Thread:
http://www.pianoworld.com/ubb/ubb/ultimatebb.php?/topic/1/8776.html#000000
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
L
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,297
Originally Posted by Jeanne W
Larry:

I agree with Rickster, your stained glass windows are beautiful.

And your comments about huge panes of double insulated glass…

"Now, technology has advanced and we can make huge panes of double insulated glass. To me, these big windows give old houses a blank look. They weren’t like that originally, the muntins are a design element that adds visual interest to a house. The muntins also break up the view from the inside."

…rang true with me.

One of the New England style wood siding houses in my neighborhood has been renovated. The house looks good in general, but whoever did the renovation removed the original historic windows that had smaller panes of glass and wooden muntins and replaced them with windows that each consist of one huge pane of glass.

The house appears to have lost its soul.

Sad.

Jeanne W


Thanks Jeanne, we love our stained glass windows. Most of the houses on the street have lost their original stained glass windows. If the windows start to bow, or the lead starts breaking and falling out, the windows have to be repaired or they will be lost.

Yes, houses with huge plate windows look like they’ve lost their souls, like their eyes have been poked out. I grew up in Connecticut, in an area with a lot of homes from the 1700s, even back to 1695. A Colonial house without muntins just doesn’t look right to me.

Look at all the styles that Bill is working on in what I posted above. Windows can be very interesting and can add a lot to the look of a house.

Page 2 of 3 1 2 3

Moderated by  Ken Knapp, Piano World 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
Piano Buyer - Read the Articles, Explore the website
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
does anyone know how tall richter was
by pablobear - 05/25/22 08:17 PM
Best piano app for android
by Kihar - 05/25/22 12:54 PM
I left my piano school today
by Animisha - 05/25/22 12:33 PM
Drummer need suggestion for piano style
by Wundebober - 05/25/22 12:08 PM
6 Pin DIN connector for Williams sustain pedal?
by emaydeoh - 05/25/22 11:18 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums43
Topics213,235
Posts3,194,517
Members105,374
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2022 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5