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Eh I don't see too much interest in mathematics too to be honest. I do see more interest for chess, though.

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If you're a subscriber to Wondrium, formerly The Great Courses Plus, they have a fascinating course called "How Music and Mathematics Relate". As well as many, many other courses I found fascinating.

You could do a free trial to watch it and then cancel. When I subscribed originally years ago that's what I did and then they started sending me massively reduced offers by email when I did not sign up so I signed up.

https://www.wondrium.com/how-music-and-mathematics-relate

There's also a 118 page PDF called the Guidebook that seems to be the course without the videos.

Ray


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The reason why there is this connection goes back to Pythagorus, originator of modern maths,…he was able to determine with geometry, fractions and discrete ratios to come to what we know as the western musical scales. Historical records determined he was passing a iron smith banging with his hammer..and noting the weight ratio of hammer and metal..created certain notes/harmonies…

… he was able to determine that all things in the universe are in constant state of vibration. That vibration, hertz, is determined by mass…

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Originally Posted by Pianoperformance
The reason why there is this connection goes back to Pythagorus, originator of modern maths,…he was able to determine with geometry, fractions and discrete ratios to come to what we know as the western musical scales. Historical records determined he was passing a iron smith banging with his hammer..and noting the weight ratio of hammer and metal..created certain notes/harmonies…

… he was able to determine that all things in the universe are in constant state of vibration. That vibration, hertz, is determined by mass…
This thread is about interest and/or skill in chess, music, and math. What you are discussing is something completely different.

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I understand your problem because I've experienced it the same way. In fact, the only advice I can give you is just to practice more.

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Originally Posted by LavaWave
I just started playing piano a couple of days ago at my niece house on her upright, however I always struggled with math.

You don't need to know maths for learning and playing the piano. Each person has their own abilities, capabilities and potential ----- and also constraints (such as environment, lifestyle, resources etc etc etc). If you like the piano and music - and you want to learn ----- and you are privileged and lucky enough to have a piano of any sort - regardless of what sort it is ------- then just get in there, and begin to learn and accumulate the music knowledge and piano skills.

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Originally Posted by ranjit
Originally Posted by keystring
A story. I was mystified by the statement that music and math go hand in hand, and "if you're goot at math then you'll be good at music". I suck at math, but music has always come naturally to me, so what gives? One day I was in a hardware store, had forgotten my credit card, and only had a mass of coins. The cashier said "Just pour out the coins. Don't worry, I'm a mathematician." (math major, working part time?) She didn't count or add up the coins, she grouped them. Well, you'll know - 4 quarters = one dollar; two groups of 5 dimes = one dollar. A lightbulb went off in my head as I saw these patterns on the table. Music has always been patterns for me. Here were money number patterns. I told the cashier "Thank you. You've helped me understand my music teacher."

It took me decades to discover that often subjects are taught poorly, and we may suck at, or hate, subjects due to how they were taught. I suspect that the way math was taught actually made it hard for me. If I were a 'natural' maybe I'd have skimmed over that and found my own way. History and geography: hated them, got close to fails in school - When I started to look at music history, I had to go back to history and geography and by golly they are fascinating! It's how they were taught.
As a "natural" at math, I didn't have to be taught most of this stuff. Maybe just that sense is what constitutes talent.

Only saw this now.

You can see this from a totally different angle. That is - things can be taught in such a way that they become difficult, and if the student had not been "taught", the problem would never arise. As an example, I was not taught music and picked up a host of patterns that exist in music. This all became second nature. Later I saw music theory taught in a way that would have been confusing to me, and I saw people struggling. Because of my own beginnings, when I finally did get music theory, I simply related it to what I had already picked up. When I finally saw the connection per the anecdote I wrote about, I suspected that this had happened to me in math. If I could unlearn how I had learned math, and start with a clean slate my relationship might be a lot different.

Another example is languages. I know someone who had his first exposure to a foreign language in high school. I already know how badly languages are taught, so the story made sense to me. This person concluded that she was just naturally bad at languages, and would never be able to learn another language. Then learned another language in her own way after high school - thought it might have been a weird way of learning (it wasn't). At this point the person can read and write four languages, and converse well in one other language where there had been exposure to the oral part. My second language, which is my primary or native language, was English, which I learned at age 5. I never had "language lessons" in the way they are commonly given, so my ability to learn language never got contorted - just like with music.

The way things are taught can actually harm learning (or help).

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OP, I am living proof that maths ability and piano playing ability are not related.

I’m really excellent at maths. smile

Seriously, as long as you can count to, I don’t know, 13 or something you can play the piano.


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True. And also ----- seriously ----- no joke here ------ if you can push just a single key on a piano, and play that single key in various ways (eg. repeated taps, or hold it down for five seconds, then release, or three quick taps and then a long hold, then release etc) ------ then that's play the piano. We all got to start somewhere.

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