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I'm in Canada. I've noticed that among the major retailers, all of them, without exceptions I can see, advertise their DP offerings at the exact same Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP). Evidently, there must agreements between makers and sellers which appear intent on maximizing corporate profits by virtually eliminating what would otherwise be healthy entrepreneurial competition. Surfing from website to website, it's almost comically absurd just how copycat the sellers can be. Marketing and promotion appear about as creative and customer-centric as the banking industry, or the airlines, or the cable companies,...ie. abysmal!

From this consumer's perspective it looks like a rigged game, but I don't want to leap to any erroneous conclusions about this scheme of identical pricing. But what's the rationale?

Nevertheless, behind the public face, I'm sure there must be some room to dicker, but I'd expect to hear that old, cliche, lament, "Well you know, our margins are so darn thin on these products, we don't really have room to move...but here, we'll throw in this pad of staff paper free!" Waa...waa...waa! Send in the violins.

Is there room in gross/net margins enough to make a good negotiating effort?

Ironically, one large retailer offers their "Price Match Guarantee", which strikes me as sucker's ploy when everyone is already matching everyone else price-wise anyway. Nothing said about going below a competitor.

Given that where I live (PEI, Canada), if I ever had a warranty claim or needed repair, the local franchisee of the national chain (Long & MacQuade) would be out-sourcing the work, meaning, I could buy from virtually anyone anywhere because there's no local advantage. I include the ridiculous plea to "shop local", when L&M's own predatory antics have practically gobbled up most music stores in eastern Canada, profits flying back home to Toronto.

I dunno, maybe pursuing room to negotiate is more of a practical thing to do in the USA? But when I go to buy my DP, cash in hand, there's no way I'll just passively suck up the full retail price, not without a solid push back.

Any tips? What have you learned? What other factors am I not considering here? Should I play off competitors against one another or is that futile? I'll be in Toronto in August so conceivably I could do the rounds, prospecting best deals.

Last edited by bob@pei; 06/28/22 10:18 PM.
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I don't know about Canada, but in the USA the major manufacturers have a minimum advertised price that is somewhat lower than MSRP. Authorized dealers are prohibited from advertising lower than that price. So most online retailers end up advertising at that same MAP price, though not all.

Retailers are allowed to discount the minimum advertised price if you call them directly. This is often hinted at in the online listing with language about calling directly for special deals. Supply chain problems being what they are post-Covid, that practice is less common now though MAP pricing still seems to be common.

A price match guarantee implies that if you did get a discount from MAP by calling/visiting a dealer directly, the matching dealer would match that price (if you called or visited them). More generally I'd interpret it as another way of saying that they're willing to negotiate at less than MAP, if you contact them directly.

Pre-Covid it was easy to call around and get various offers that you could compare or negotiate. Post-Covid, I was offered an instrument at MAP that was in stock that day (after waiting on back-order for six months at another retailer), and I took it without a second thought.

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The best negotiation tactic on part of the public is to not buy anything. this is largely happening. piano companies are faltering and pianism is on constant retreat. by protecting turfs and price fixing, they've locked themselves into a downward trajectory with minimal innovation, minimum value delivered to customers, while other industries which compete for mindspace do the exact opposite. the piano industry needs a playstation/xbox, loss leader freemium model. then sell vst sets through microtransactions.

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Originally Posted by KawaFanboi
this is largely happening.

Piano factories, distributors, and dealers are sold out of a lot of things right now. You realize that, right?
Read the Music Trades if you want to attach actual numbers to your theories.


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Originally Posted by fred768
I don't know about Canada, but in the USA the major manufacturers have a minimum advertised price that is somewhat lower than MSRP. Authorized dealers are prohibited from advertising lower than that price. So most online retailers end up advertising at that same MAP price, though not all.

Retailers are allowed to discount the minimum advertised price if you call them directly. This is often hinted at in the online listing with language about calling directly for special deals. Supply chain problems being what they are post-Covid, that practice is less common now though MAP pricing still seems to be common.

A price match guarantee implies that if you did get a discount from MAP by calling/visiting a dealer directly, the matching dealer would match that price (if you called or visited them). More generally I'd interpret it as another way of saying that they're willing to negotiate at less than MAP, if you contact them directly.

Pre-Covid it was easy to call around and get various offers that you could compare or negotiate. Post-Covid, I was offered an instrument at MAP that was in stock that day (after waiting on back-order for six months at another retailer), and I took it without a second thought.

Thanks @fred768 for this industry info. It'll be helpful when I start prospecting. Going the direct method makes sense. Maybe the Pre/Post-Covid catastrophe has been more acute in the USA because I seek out Canadian retailers, all of them have what looks like plenty of inventory, at least now.

Got to admit that manufacturers imposing forced pricing kinda pisses me off. It's anti-competitive, cowardly and a predatory policy. It also makes me suspicious about margins guarded with clenched fists. Maybe they're not so thin after all? I dunno.

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Originally Posted by KawaFanboi
The best negotiation tactic on part of the public is to not buy anything. this is largely happening. piano companies are faltering and pianism is on constant retreat. by protecting turfs and price fixing, they've locked themselves into a downward trajectory with minimal innovation, minimum value delivered to customers, while other industries which compete for mindspace do the exact opposite. the piano industry needs a playstation/xbox, loss leader freemium model. then sell vst sets through microtransactions.

An intriguing critique of the piano industry, @KawaFanboi. Plausible, too. I've come to learn many share this view, especially concerning "minimal innovation". I wonder if there's agency somewhere tracking global DP production/sales trends with stats and historical trends.

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Originally Posted by terminaldegree
Originally Posted by KawaFanboi
this is largely happening.

Piano factories, distributors, and dealers are sold out of a lot of things right now. You realize that, right?
Read the Music Trades if you want to attach actual numbers to your theories.

Assuming this "sold out" malady is true, it doesn't appear to be uniform across different countries. Checking with Canadian retailers, the big ones, anyway, they look like they've got plenty of stock. Bluffing, I dunno. Maybe all these debilitating component shortages, production shutdowns and shipping fiascos are starting to get resolved?

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Originally Posted by terminaldegree
Originally Posted by KawaFanboi
this is largely happening.

Piano factories, distributors, and dealers are sold out of a lot of things right now. You realize that, right?
Read the Music Trades if you want to attach actual numbers to your theories.
Double ditto on that. I've been waiting a year to just try, let alone buy, an NV5S or 10S. There are none to be had around here that I can find. Last year they predicted they'd have some the middle of this year. Fingers crossed


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Since you are a fairly new member here, you might not be aware of the recent years of history behind the basic formula for DP pricing had been working long before the virus took over the world.

- MSRP - a number that DP manufacturers post in their on-line literature, like car manufacturers/dealers do…. just a high number to hang out there as some starting point.
Sales history/figures/info that have a few ways of leaking into the consciousness of average people - such as were regularly updated here in the master sticky thread of prices paid by PW members- put in perspective that MSRP numbers advertised by manufacturers were generally intended to make street pricing numbers offered by resellers/vendors look very enticing by comparison.

- Street Price - generally ( with some exceptions) a significantly lower “going rate” number that me-too internet resellers/vendors post in their online advertisements….. the basic message being “ as an authorized reseller, we are able to sell said DP well under the manufacturer’s MSRP!”; Amazon, Kraft, Sweetwater et al to include European variants of the me-too resellers.

- dicker/haggle/negotiate - can be attempted anywhere in the world, not just America, with results that probably will vary all over the world depending on various other factors/market conditions and haggling skills of the potential purchaser. Anyone is free to try dickering against whatever number - MSRP, Street, other - a given seller offers, for which, in return, any seller is supposedly free to entertain OR dismiss.

- manufacturers compelling * or otherwise encouraging their resellers to not publicize deals they make with purchasers who make a purchase that is both well under the MSRP and also well below the going Street Price. It is generally understood that manufacturers allow their dealers room to sell within a range from MSRP to at or somewhere below Street BUT they can go only so low. In turn, it appears that dealers who offer really good deals to a given purchaser compel or otherwise encourage their customers - such as via an NDA - to not publicly reveal how good a deal they got. This in turn makes discussion of such circumstances ripe to be dismissed as whacky conspiracy.

* if you had spent time digesting the master sticky prices-paid thread before it became somewhat defunct, you would have noticed over time recurrence of fuzzy info posted by some purchasers, often enough to realize some purchasers often had reasons to not disclose the pertinent $ numbers involved so that readers could fully appreciate how good their deal was…. c’est la vie.


Some of the above routine has been impacted / altered due to any of all the many reported economic disruptions that followed in the wake of the virus. You may find dealers who are standing their ground at or near MSRP for some makes/models, particularly higher range models. You must also factor in how the apparent inflationary forces have led some brands to jack up their retail and or street prices so as to pass on to the consumer their losses caused by the economic disruptions.

Just one example of many that could be cited: Yamaha US currently shows MSRP of $1299 for DGX670, while run of the mill me-too resellers are offering for $849 and the Yamaha shop near me was selling for $799 as recent as mid-May.


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Originally Posted by drewr
Since you are a fairly new member here, you might not be aware of the recent years of history behind the basic formula for DP pricing had been working long before the virus took over the world.

- MSRP - a number that DP manufacturers post in their on-line literature, like car manufacturers/dealers do…. just a high number to hang out there as some starting point.
Sales history/figures/info that have a few ways of leaking into the consciousness of average people - such as were regularly updated here in the master sticky thread of prices paid by PW members- put in perspective that MSRP numbers advertised by manufacturers were generally intended to make street pricing numbers offered by resellers/vendors look very enticing by comparison.

- Street Price - generally ( with some exceptions) a significantly lower “going rate” number that me-too internet resellers/vendors post in their online advertisements….. the basic message being “ as an authorized reseller, we are able to sell said DP well under the manufacturer’s MSRP!”; Amazon, Kraft, Sweetwater et al to include European variants of the me-too resellers.

- dicker/haggle/negotiate - can be attempted anywhere in the world, not just America, with results that probably will vary all over the world depending on various other factors/market conditions and haggling skills of the potential purchaser. Anyone is free to try dickering against whatever number - MSRP, Street, other - a given seller offers, for which, in return, any seller is supposedly free to entertain OR dismiss.

- manufacturers compelling * or otherwise encouraging their resellers to not publicize deals they make with purchasers who make a purchase that is both well under the MSRP and also well below the going Street Price. It is generally understood that manufacturers allow their dealers room to sell within a range from MSRP to at or somewhere below Street BUT they can go only so low. In turn, it appears that dealers who offer really good deals to a given purchaser compel or otherwise encourage their customers - such as via an NDA - to not publicly reveal how good a deal they got. This in turn makes discussion of such circumstances ripe to be dismissed as whacky conspiracy.

* if you had spent time digesting the master sticky prices-paid thread before it became somewhat defunct, you would have noticed over time recurrence of fuzzy info posted by some purchasers, often enough to realize some purchasers often had reasons to not disclose the pertinent $ numbers involved so that readers could fully appreciate how good their deal was…. c’est la vie.


Some of the above routine has been impacted / altered due to any of all the many reported economic disruptions that followed in the wake of the virus. You may find dealers who are standing their ground at or near MSRP for some makes/models, particularly higher range models. You must also factor in how the apparent inflationary forces have led some brands to jack up their retail and or street prices so as to pass on to the consumer their losses caused by the economic disruptions.

Just one example of many that could be cited: Yamaha US currently shows MSRP of $1299 for DGX670, while run of the mill me-too resellers are offering for $849 and the Yamaha shop near me was selling for $799 as recent as mid-May.

Thanks @drewr for setting out some really instructive information on DP industry price standards, foibles, variations. Yeah, thanks for the tip pointing to master sticky prices thread. I hadn't put 2 and 2 together to connect my question to it. I will haggle as I'm comfortable in the role, especially always prepared to walk out empty handed if need be. Stubborn meets stubborn, I guess.

What you and others have revealed, for me, gives a bit of a boost to the option of buying used from a non-corporate, private individual. A whole new set of pitfalls, certainly. That said, I've noticed may of these individual sellers may not understand or appreciate the meaning of "depreciation" or "technological progress". On the other hand, most private sellers aren't savvy negotiators, often beating themselves down in price with even the gentlest nudge.

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Originally Posted by bob@pei
I'm in Canada. I've noticed that among the major retailers, all of them, without exceptions I can see, advertise their DP offerings at the exact same Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP). Evidently, there must agreements between makers and sellers which appear intent on maximizing corporate profits by virtually eliminating what would otherwise be healthy entrepreneurial competition. Surfing from website to website, it's almost comically absurd just how copycat the sellers can be. Marketing and promotion appear about as creative and customer-centric as the banking industry, or the airlines, or the cable companies,...ie. abysmal!

From this consumer's perspective it looks like a rigged game, but I don't want to leap to any erroneous conclusions about this scheme of identical pricing. But what's the rationale?

Nevertheless, behind the public face, I'm sure there must be some room to dicker, but I'd expect to hear that old, cliche, lament, "Well you know, our margins are so darn thin on these products, we don't really have room to move...but here, we'll throw in this pad of staff paper free!" Waa...waa...waa! Send in the violins.

Is there room in gross/net margins enough to make a good negotiating effort?

Ironically, one large retailer offers their "Price Match Guarantee", which strikes me as sucker's ploy when everyone is already matching everyone else price-wise anyway. Nothing said about going below a competitor.

Given that where I live (PEI, Canada), if I ever had a warranty claim or needed repair, the local franchisee of the national chain (Long & MacQuade) would be out-sourcing the work, meaning, I could buy from virtually anyone anywhere because there's no local advantage. I include the ridiculous plea to "shop local", when L&M's own predatory antics have practically gobbled up most music stores in eastern Canada, profits flying back home to Toronto.

I dunno, maybe pursuing room to negotiate is more of a practical thing to do in the USA? But when I go to buy my DP, cash in hand, there's no way I'll just passively suck up the full retail price, not without a solid push back.

Any tips? What have you learned? What other factors am I not considering here? Should I play off competitors against one another or is that futile? I'll be in Toronto in August so conceivably I could do the rounds, prospecting best deals.

Is there a store worst than L&M in Canada?

I haggled twice with Steves and another store in Ottawa and purchased a guitar and my MP7SE. We all were happy and became friends.

You usually can haggle with owner-operated stores.

I once went to L&M and told the manager if I can buy the same gear from the next-door music store why should I drive that far and purchase it from L&M for the same price? He had no answer.

There are some strange businesses in Canada. Like MR. SUB. During my university years (as a student) I took the bus to Toronto (greyhound) and ordered a steak sub at MR. SUB in the bus terminal. The dude pulled out a scale!!! I had never ever seen this sort of nonsens in my home country (in the middle east).

Let the L&M go to helll.

Last edited by Abdol; 06/29/22 04:17 PM.

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Originally Posted by Abdol
Originally Posted by bob@pei
I'm in Canada. I've noticed that among the major retailers, all of them, without exceptions I can see, advertise their DP offerings at the exact same Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP). Evidently, there must agreements between makers and sellers which appear intent on maximizing corporate profits by virtually eliminating what would otherwise be healthy entrepreneurial competition. Surfing from website to website, it's almost comically absurd just how copycat the sellers can be. Marketing and promotion appear about as creative and customer-centric as the banking industry, or the airlines, or the cable companies,...ie. abysmal!

From this consumer's perspective it looks like a rigged game, but I don't want to leap to any erroneous conclusions about this scheme of identical pricing. But what's the rationale?

Nevertheless, behind the public face, I'm sure there must be some room to dicker, but I'd expect to hear that old, cliche, lament, "Well you know, our margins are so darn thin on these products, we don't really have room to move...but here, we'll throw in this pad of staff paper free!" Waa...waa...waa! Send in the violins.

Is there room in gross/net margins enough to make a good negotiating effort?

Ironically, one large retailer offers their "Price Match Guarantee", which strikes me as sucker's ploy when everyone is already matching everyone else price-wise anyway. Nothing said about going below a competitor.

Given that where I live (PEI, Canada), if I ever had a warranty claim or needed repair, the local franchisee of the national chain (Long & MacQuade) would be out-sourcing the work, meaning, I could buy from virtually anyone anywhere because there's no local advantage. I include the ridiculous plea to "shop local", when L&M's own predatory antics have practically gobbled up most music stores in eastern Canada, profits flying back home to Toronto.

I dunno, maybe pursuing room to negotiate is more of a practical thing to do in the USA? But when I go to buy my DP, cash in hand, there's no way I'll just passively suck up the full retail price, not without a solid push back.

Any tips? What have you learned? What other factors am I not considering here? Should I play off competitors against one another or is that futile? I'll be in Toronto in August so conceivably I could do the rounds, prospecting best deals.

Is there a store worst than L&M in Canada?

I haggled twice with Steves and another store in Ottawa and purchased a guitar and my MP7SE. We all were happy and became friends.

You usually can haggle with owner-operated stores.

I once went to L&M and told the manager if I can buy the same gear from the next-door music store why should I drive that far and purchase it from L&M for the same price? He had no answer.

There are some strange businesses in Canada. Like MR. SUB. During my university years (as a student) I took the bus to Toronto (greyhound) and ordered a steak sub at MR. SUB in the bus terminal. The dude pulled out a scale!!! I had never ever seen this sort of nonsens in my home country (in the middle east).

Let the L&M go to helll.

Fellow Canuck, thanks for weighing in, @Abdol. Not a big L&M fan, eh? I think I get it.

Unfortunately, L&M is the sole monopolistic option in PEI. But I think I'll try to open up my options when I visit Toronto in August. Steve's Music would certainly by on the list. What about Merriman (sp?). Cosmos? Sorry, these questions are regionally specific so you could PM me if you had any further suggestions.

Yeah, I've also seen the scale come out at Subway. Pretty tacky, makes the management who order this type of rustic blunder look like cheapskate idiots.

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Originally Posted by bob@pei
I’m in Canada. I've noticed that among the major retailers, all of them, without exceptions I can see, advertise their DP offerings at the exact same Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP). Evidently, there must agreements between makers and sellers which appear intent on maximizing corporate profits by virtually eliminating what would otherwise be healthy entrepreneurial competition. Surfing from website to website, it's almost comically absurd just how copycat the sellers can be. Marketing and promotion appear about as creative and customer-centric as the banking industry, or the airlines, or the cable companies,...ie. abysmal!

From this consumer's perspective it looks like a rigged game ….

, but I don't want to leap to any erroneous conclusions about this

What you have noticed re: the increasingly uniform / generic approach to selling DP stuff is not at all unlike the way some people have similarly noticed the way news reporting is increasingly being sold across the many different regions/sectors.

Viewers in any community small to big existing within the assigned regionalized markets - mid-Atlantic versus northeast ( may include or at least resemble advertising and news sent to the PEI region) versus the south versus mid-western versus mountain/California/et al markets - can buy advertised stuff and watch their locally reported national news headlines on whatever ISP and TV network[s] affiliate serves their hometown community. The same probably applies to those residing in sectors in the East - Europe and thereabouts - but just sticking to the sectors within the Americas, whichever region in which somebody resides and receives broadcast content, they get male & female anchors who may speak in different dialects and accents familiar to their region BUT otherwise they deliver the same generic vanilla text as news.

Doubters who may go online …. to surf for a “broader/global news perspective”, can find video examples that comprise a montage of news reporting sewn together from outlets locally airing all across the continent. It does not matter if someone watched local news in or near upstate New York, or NYC, or rural parts of Pennsylvania ….. to Alabama, or backwater parts in Louisiana and Texas, or Dallas and New Orleans and Las Vegas and LaLaLand etc., therein the reported news will be found to be not unlike DP pricing; seemingly generic, verbatim, as though produced from uniformly scripted text read from teleprompters by different anchors any of whom may have applied their own unique melodramatic acting flare in delivering the exact same text otherwise known as “the news”.

Your mission, if you choose to accept it, is to narrow down some range of new and used DPs you may have decided fits your requirements - to include price range - and then you go out “there” and find out if you are able to get it, on your terms .….. and as Sergeant Esterhaus was once famous for advising “ hey, lets be careful out there”.


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Originally Posted by drewr
Originally Posted by bob@pei
I’m in Canada. I've noticed that among the major retailers, all of them, without exceptions I can see, advertise their DP offerings at the exact same Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP). Evidently, there must agreements between makers and sellers which appear intent on maximizing corporate profits by virtually eliminating what would otherwise be healthy entrepreneurial competition. Surfing from website to website, it's almost comically absurd just how copycat the sellers can be. Marketing and promotion appear about as creative and customer-centric as the banking industry, or the airlines, or the cable companies,...ie. abysmal!

From this consumer's perspective it looks like a rigged game ….

, but I don't want to leap to any erroneous conclusions about this

What you have noticed re: the increasingly uniform / generic approach to selling DP stuff is not at all unlike the way some people have similarly noticed the way news reporting is increasingly being sold across the many different regions/sectors.

Viewers in any community small to big existing within the assigned regionalized markets - mid-Atlantic versus northeast ( may include or at least resemble advertising and news sent to the PEI region) versus the south versus mid-western versus mountain/California/et al markets - can buy advertised stuff and watch their locally reported national news headlines on whatever ISP and TV network[s] affiliate serves their hometown community. The same probably applies to those residing in sectors in the East - Europe and thereabouts - but just sticking to the sectors within the Americas, whichever region in which somebody resides and receives broadcast content, they get male & female anchors who may speak in different dialects and accents familiar to their region BUT otherwise they deliver the same generic vanilla text as news.

Doubters who may go online …. to surf for a “broader/global news perspective”, can find video examples that comprise a montage of news reporting sewn together from outlets locally airing all across the continent. It does not matter if someone watched local news in or near upstate New York, or NYC, or rural parts of Pennsylvania ….. to Alabama, or backwater parts in Louisiana and Texas, or Dallas and New Orleans and Las Vegas and LaLaLand etc., therein the reported news will be found to be not unlike DP pricing; seemingly generic, verbatim, as though produced from uniformly scripted text read from teleprompters by different anchors any of whom may have applied their own unique melodramatic acting flare in delivering the exact same text otherwise known as “the news”.

Your mission, if you choose to accept it, is to narrow down some range of new and used DPs you may have decided fits your requirements - to include price range - and then you go out “there” and find out if you are able to get it, on your terms .….. and as Sergeant Esterhaus was once famous for advising “ hey, lets be careful out there”.

I don't know much about media reporting, but what you're saying here about its vanilla character these days is plausible. Yeah, and I'm getting a tighter list of DP candidates, but the discipline right now is to hold off until I make my rounds in the metropolis in August. (Toronto).

So far, I've got these in mind:
Yamaha P515 (where I live, by far the best technical support of all companies post-sale warranty and service)
Roland FP60X (the 90X is too much of a budget basher) I love the design and built in audio interface.
Studio Logic Numa X GT (really intrigued by this one, just a little jittery about warranty and repairs) This one is giving me The Lamborghini Complex i.e. delusions of driving in Italian convertible sports car grandeur, cruising down the Riviera, DP in the passenger seat (with her kerchief chattering in the wind).
Any Korg with RH3 action (I'm curious, maybe all I need is a bargain D1, no speakers)

Ruled out:
Roland A88 MKII midi controller. I've been persuaded that enjoying zero dependency on a computer is practical and productive (fewer distractions).
Roland FP30X (the downward speakers is a turnoff, no registrations, no EQ)
All arranger type keyboards (e.g. DGX670, Casio PXS3100, Roland RD88); I think these would present too many seductive distractions to pull me away from the singular goal of improving piano technical skills). Things like "auto-accompaniment" as advanced as they might be, give me the paint-by-numbers heebeejeebees!

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bob, how much experience do you have with digital pianos/ pianos, when i was shopping i was ready to solve everything with money, but the expensive models failed to impress, it's not that i had high expectations, doing some research after the fact i've come to the conclusion that they've stagnated.

i'd recommend buying the basic es110/120 if you're in europe and playing with the onboard and pc pianoteq demo to see how it feels.

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Originally Posted by KawaFanboi
bob, how much experience do you have with digital pianos/ pianos, when i was shopping i was ready to solve everything with money, but the expensive models failed to impress, it's not that i had high expectations, doing some research after the fact i've come to the conclusion that they've stagnated.

i'd recommend buying the basic es110/120 if you're in europe and playing with the onboard and pc pianoteq demo to see how it feels.

Thanks for the frank advice, @KawaFanboi. And I think I can appreciate where you're coming from on this topic. My experience with digital pianos amounts to a big fat ZERO. Now, I have had a midi keyboard for a few years, pretty good with music theory, but finding that 61 keys of spongey action just doesn't fit my more recent goal to get some more solid piano skills. I'd peg my level at late beginner. Your Kawai es110/120 suggestions would certainly be contenders but I'm not in Europe and the closest Kawai dealer is an eight-hour drive away. I'd be uptight about anything that needed fixing.

That said, along what I'd guess is similar thinking to yours, I could get away with a low budget solution, a Korg D1 (no speakers) and do exactly what you're prescribing with my existing setup, which is desktop computer, DAW, audio interface, studio monitors, VSTs. Pianoteq is indeed on my shopping list. I don't hear too much on this forum about the Korg, but as I understand it their RH3 keybed stacks up a legitimate platform.

Where I live (Prince Edward Island, Canada), my best (and only!) factory-authorized support is Yamaha, Roland and Korg. I've called them and they have solid relationships and efficient shipping and turnaround to handle mechanical/electronic problems. Given this short list of accessible DP makers, how would you tweak your advice to me to "see how it feels" before jumping into deep expensive water?


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