Piano World Home Page
Posted By: Long Louis Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 07:11 AM
One of the most spectacular new piano projects of the past years might be the return to straight strung concert grands by Chris Maene. Having hearf one recital on sich a piano, I was deeply impressed by its sound. I am not sure if this was because of the good craftsmanship in general or an impact of the straight strings. Alas, I did not have the chance to play one yet.

Now this kind of pianos seem to hit your living rooms in a smaller version. Did anyone have the chance to play one already? Are the bass strings too short by now for a moving acoustic experience?


https://www.chrismaene.be/nl/the-straight-strung-grand-piano/parlor-grand-cm200/
Posted By: maucycy Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 08:07 AM
If I am not mistaken he also did piano for Daniel Barenboim. I do not know how it sounds live, heard one recording or two, but as general I am left indifferent with Bareboim's performances so the piano doesn't bother me as well.

They used modern technology to use the original piano string fit.

Definitely it is something different - but at least till today all of the "other" piano designs have not made any commercial success. Other thing is, that Maene is very different on a fundamental thing, not just look or just being different to be different. Future will tell.
Posted By: Long Louis Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 12:50 PM
It was Barenboim, whom I heard at a smaller venue. I never heard a better piano sound, but I had no A B comparison with other grands in this specific hall. So I could not compare.

I understand that several innovations and benchmark technologies are included in these pianos, so it is not the physical difference alone attributing to its individual sound.

My main intention here was to understand whether the piano could also be an interesting home piano alternative in the 7 ft class due to the mixture of features or whether this does not work at smaller lengths. There was a reason to dicontinue straight strung grands…
Posted By: pyropaul Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 01:29 PM
Chris Maene is not the only builder doing straight-strung concert grands. Stephen Paulello (maker of piano wire) also has been doing this for a while. See https://www.stephenpaulello.com/en/pianos
Posted By: WilliamTruitt Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 04:34 PM
Stephen Paulello came out with his straight strung Opus 102 in 2015

Arno Patin finished building a 9' concert grand (one of only one) about 2 years ago.
Posted By: RobAC Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 04:44 PM
Might someone help me remember or understand, other than for stylistic reasons in earlier repertoire, why someone would build or require a straight-strung grand?
Posted By: Maestro Lennie Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 05:00 PM
As you say, stylistic reasons. Straight-strung pianos have much more variety in tone color across registers. Most 19c and earlier music fits well with that palette.
Posted By: pyropaul Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 05:11 PM
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
As you say, stylistic reasons. Straight-strung pianos have much more variety in tone color across registers. Most 19c and earlier music fits well with that palette.

That's not what Stephen Paulello says - from the page I linked above he says:

"Above all, it is the characteristic sonority of parallel stringings which influenced our choice. The transparency, stability and airiness in the sound give the piano a three dimensional aspect and a natural spatializing of the different registers. Parallelism also eliminates the heaviness and blurring inherent to the medium bass."

Paul.
Posted By: Withindale Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 05:17 PM
https://www.stephenpaulello.com/en/pianos

Why this would be so, parallelism also eliminates the heaviness and blurring inherent to the medium bass?
Posted By: Maestro Lennie Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 05:20 PM
Originally Posted by pyropaul
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
As you say, stylistic reasons. Straight-strung pianos have much more variety in tone color across registers. Most 19c and earlier music fits well with that palette.

That's not what Stephen Paulello says - from the page I linked above he says:

"Above all, it is the characteristic sonority of parallel stringings which influenced our choice. The transparency, stability and airiness in the sound give the piano a three dimensional aspect and a natural spatializing of the different registers. Parallelism also eliminates the heaviness and blurring inherent to the medium bass."

Paul.
Well-- 'natural spatializing of the different registers' might also be thought to imply less homogeneity of tone, or 'characteristic sonority', if you will.
Posted By: pyropaul Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 05:26 PM
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
Originally Posted by pyropaul
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
As you say, stylistic reasons. Straight-strung pianos have much more variety in tone color across registers. Most 19c and earlier music fits well with that palette.

That's not what Stephen Paulello says - from the page I linked above he says:

"Above all, it is the characteristic sonority of parallel stringings which influenced our choice. The transparency, stability and airiness in the sound give the piano a three dimensional aspect and a natural spatializing of the different registers. Parallelism also eliminates the heaviness and blurring inherent to the medium bass."

Paul.
Well-- 'natural spatializing of the different registers' might also be thought to imply less homogeneity of tone, or 'characteristic sonority', if you will.

All pianos have heterogeneous tone due to the different types of strings used (which have very different inharmonicity constants as well as sound characters). It would be next to impossible to make a piano which used only one type of string throughout, though that monster 19' long piano in New Zealand is maybe the closest. If anything, using a frame without bars increases homogeneity as you don't get the "breaks" in scaling you get with a conventional frame.

Paul.
Posted By: Withindale Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 05:48 PM
Originally Posted by Withindale
https://www.stephenpaulello.com/en/pianos

Why this would be so, parallelism also eliminates the heaviness and blurring inherent to the medium bass?

Yes but what about this blurring, anyone?
Posted By: terminaldegree Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 05:50 PM
Originally Posted by RobAC
Might someone help me remember or understand, other than for stylistic reasons in earlier repertoire, why someone would build or require a straight-strung grand?

In some ways, it might be easier to visualize why pianos evolved away from the design. Not terminating low bass strings in the lefthand corner of the tail of the instrument, but instead closer to the center of the tail of the piano, generally resulted in better bass tone. I believe the overstrung bass of the modern piano also allows for a longer bass string length. Some of the newer designs incorporate a greater over-stringing angle and a "wide tail" and associated soundboard area, which is probably also a design point of contention among the technical community. But it has generally been my observation that most older overstrung designs tend to have a narrower tail and more conservative angle for the bass strings.

Please note that I am not a piano designer.
Posted By: BDB Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 06:17 PM
Another reason for overstringing is to improve the coupling of the tenor strings to the bass strings.
Posted By: MrSh4nkly Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 07:55 PM
Originally Posted by Withindale
Why this would be so, parallelism also eliminates the heaviness and blurring inherent to the medium bass?
I'm thinking that, when the dampers are raised on a standard grand piano, and you play medium bass notes, the strings of the deep bass notes that pass over the strings for the medium bass notes you're playing vibrate in sympathy, due to their proximity, thus adding "heaviness and blurring" to the medium bass notes.
Posted By: MrSh4nkly Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 08:17 PM
^ It's amazing to me how much strings vibrate in response to other sounds. As a gift to each other over the holidays, my wife and I got a bluetick beagle puppy, and he started howling at me for attention during a practice session (or maybe he was trying to sing along, or didn't approve, not sure). I howled back at him jokingly and happened to have the dampers raised at the moment. The strings echoed my howl. It sounded incredibly spooky. The echo was so loud my wife heard it in the kitchen with the piano in the living room separated by a wall and cabinetry.
Posted By: pyropaul Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/10/22 08:55 PM
Originally Posted by MrSh4nkly
Originally Posted by Withindale
Why this would be so, parallelism also eliminates the heaviness and blurring inherent to the medium bass?
I'm thinking that, when the dampers are raised on a standard grand piano, and you play medium bass notes, the strings of the deep bass notes that pass over the strings for the medium bass notes you're playing vibrate in sympathy, due to their proximity, thus adding "heaviness and blurring" to the medium bass notes.

All the strings in a piano are coupled together via their respective bridges and the soundboard. Some pianos have several bridges, some have just one big one, but they're all mechanically connected via the soundboard anyway. The main thing overstringing accomplishes is moving the location where the bass string bridge is more towards the centre of the soundboard. Perhaps this allows more a great bass output as the soundboard is less constrained by the rim at that point. Or maybe it makes little difference!
Posted By: David-G Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/12/22 11:57 PM
Originally Posted by terminaldegree
Originally Posted by RobAC
Might someone help me remember or understand, other than for stylistic reasons in earlier repertoire, why someone would build or require a straight-strung grand?

In some ways, it might be easier to visualize why pianos evolved away from the design. Not terminating low bass strings in the lefthand corner of the tail of the instrument, but instead closer to the center of the tail of the piano, generally resulted in better bass tone...

I think I can contribute usefully to this discussion, because my Blüthner of 1878 is essentially straight-strung in the bass. For the first 36 notes (almost half the piano) the strings are almost parallel; they fan out very slightly, but the angle of this fan, over all these 36 notes, is only about 8 degrees.

[Linked Image]

The tone quality of the bass is, I feel, extraordinary; it is incisive and has great richness, but also great clarity. My feeling is that these attributes must derive from the parallel stringing. I have tried various modern grands, including concert grands, and my general reaction is that I prefer the bass of the Blüthner.

In my piano the low bass strings do terminate in the left-hand corner of the tail of the instrument - but this seems to improve the tone rather than diminish it.

Maestro Lennie observed that "straight-strung pianos have much more variety in tone color across registers". My Blüthner, which is a transitional design before full modern overstringing was introduced, certainly has a very different tone colour - warm and sparkly - in the treble compared with the bass. This difference between the treble and bass tone means that when playing Schubert or Beethoven, for instance, there is no muddying of the bass line - it is heard clearly and separately from the treble.

The full richness of my bass does not extend down to the extreme bass - it really begins at the first G. But given that the piano is only 180 cm (about 5' 10"), this is probably not surprising. I find it amazing, though, that most of the bass on this piano is so rich and clear, despite the piano's very modest length. The OP asked whether the bass strings of Chris Maene's 200 cm Parlour Grand are "too short by now for a moving acoustic experience". On the basis of my Blüthner I would suggest that the answer is definitely not.

I understand that Julius Blüthner had a great preference for parallel stringing. I think perhaps the design of my piano was an attempt to retain the benefits of straight stringing, while introducing a measure of overstringing higher up the instrument.
Posted By: Maestro Lennie Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 03:01 AM
Originally Posted by pyropaul
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
Originally Posted by pyropaul
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
As you say, stylistic reasons. Straight-strung pianos have much more variety in tone color across registers. Most 19c and earlier music fits well with that palette.

That's not what Stephen Paulello says - from the page I linked above he says:

"Above all, it is the characteristic sonority of parallel stringings which influenced our choice. The transparency, stability and airiness in the sound give the piano a three dimensional aspect and a natural spatializing of the different registers. Parallelism also eliminates the heaviness and blurring inherent to the medium bass."

Paul.
Well-- 'natural spatializing of the different registers' might also be thought to imply less homogeneity of tone, or 'characteristic sonority', if you will.

All pianos have heterogeneous tone due to the different types of strings used (which have very different inharmonicity constants as well as sound characters). It would be next to impossible to make a piano which used only one type of string throughout, though that monster 19' long piano in New Zealand is maybe the closest. If anything, using a frame without bars increases homogeneity as you don't get the "breaks" in scaling you get with a conventional frame.

Paul.


Barenboim's comments on his own straight strung piano stress transparency, independence, and diversity. Presumably more than he gets from a standard-issue Steinway.
Posted By: WilliamTruitt Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 09:34 AM
BDB, please explain to me why cross stringing would be an improvement in coupling the tenor strings to the bass strings over a design like Paulello's Opus 102? His parallel strung piano has but a single continuous bridge, on which all strings reside.
Posted By: RobAC Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 12:48 PM
I would be interested to see (and when I have time I shall look) design details, particularly in regard to bass string length, for comparably-sized cross strung and straight string instruments.
Posted By: David-G Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 06:11 PM
Originally Posted by RobAC
I would be interested to see (and when I have time I shall look) design details, particularly in regard to bass string length, for comparably-sized cross strung and straight string instruments.

That would indeed be interesting. If you come to any conclusions, do share them!
Posted By: pyropaul Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 06:40 PM
Originally Posted by RobAC
I would be interested to see (and when I have time I shall look) design details, particularly in regard to bass string length, for comparably-sized cross strung and straight string instruments.

For my own piano (1887 Steinway A1) that's nominally 6'0", the longest bass string is 141.5cm from agraffe to 1st bridge pin. If the tail design was changed to make it square, but of the same length, the longest string that would fit (everything else being equal such as bridge to rim spacing etc) would be about 134cm - so about 6% shorter.

Paul.
Posted By: mha9 Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 07:12 PM
I became curious after reading your post. I have the same model Blüthner (+ aliquot strings) that David-G has—only a hundred or so serial numbers earlier. I measured the lowest string, sub-contra A. It's 50-1/2 inches, thus 128 cm. (David, please correct me if my measurements are off—I'm notoriously bad about such things.) I can affirm everything David says about the clarity and colorfulness of the bass of this piano. I also have a Mason & Hamlin A, which has, for a short piano, an astonishingly rich and full (and loud) bass, but it lacks the color and agility of the Blüthner's bass. Besides that, with my Blüthner (with its patent action) there's hardly any difference in key resistance between the middle of the keyboard and the lowest bass notes, inviting all kinds of delicate shaping in even the lowest registers.
Posted By: David-G Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 10:06 PM
Your measurements are not off! I always find measuring string lengths a very difficult operation, but having measured my lowest string as carefully and methodically as I could, I find it is 127.2 cm. I reckon the error could be +/- 1 cm, so I would say we are in agreement about the length.

Incidentally to fit in a string of this length, the designer has found it necessary to use a large amount of cantilever in the bass bridge - a shade less than 10 cm.

Your observation on the patent action is most interesting.

I would love to play one of the longer Blüthners of this design (with straight-strung bass), but I have never had the opportunity. There was a 270 cm model (earlier than my piano), of which there is an example in the Frederick Collection - and there was a 220 cm model (later than my piano). I would imagine that on these the deep bass would be amazing.

PS Just noticed an interesting design difference. My 180 cm model has 6 monochord strings and 20 bichords. The Fredericks' 270 cm model has 6 monochords and only 12 bichords.
Posted By: pyropaul Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 10:47 PM
Originally Posted by David-G
Your measurements are not off! I always find measuring string lengths a very difficult operation, but having measured my lowest string as carefully and methodically as I could, I find it is 127.2 cm. I reckon the error could be +/- 1 cm, so I would say we are in agreement about the length.

Incidentally to fit in a string of this length, the designer has found it necessary to use a large amount of cantilever in the bass bridge - a shade less than 10 cm.

Your observation on the patent action is most interesting.

I would love to play one of the longer Blüthners of this design (with straight-strung bass), but I have never had the opportunity. There was a 270 cm model (earlier than my piano), of which there is an example in the Frederick Collection - and there was a 220 cm model (later than my piano). I would imagine that on these the deep bass would be amazing.

PS Just noticed an interesting design difference. My 180 cm model has 6 monochord strings and 20 bichords. The Fredericks' 270 cm model has 6 monochords and only 12 bichords.


What points did you use for the measurement? My bass bridge is also cantilevered quite a lot. I just put the tape measure on the first bridge pin and eyeballed the tape as it passed over the agraffe. I didn't go from tuning pin to hitch pin.
Posted By: mha9 Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 11:21 PM
Yes, it is quite the extravagant cantilever! http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthreads.php/galleries/3184992/bl-thner-bass-bridge.html
Posted By: David-G Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 11:21 PM
Originally Posted by pyropaul
What points did you use for the measurement? My bass bridge is also cantilevered quite a lot. I just put the tape measure on the first bridge pin and eyeballed the tape as it passed over the agraffe. I didn't go from tuning pin to hitch pin.

Indeed. Agraffe to first bridge pin. I used a metre rule and a ruler, measured it in parts, and added them together.
Posted By: mha9 Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 11:22 PM
Pyropaul, I think David-G and i both measured from the agraffe to the first bridge pin and came up with roughly the same figure. (I had someone hold the and of the tape on the agraffe.)
Posted By: David-G Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/13/22 11:26 PM
Originally Posted by mha9
Yes, it is quite the extravagant cantilever!

Hope you don't mind me including your picture here. Mine is just the same!

[Linked Image]
Posted By: Maestro Lennie Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/14/22 03:14 AM
Back to the results-- found this today.

I think there is such confusion and ignorance about the significance of the geometric organization of string lengths and bridge orientations as regards the influence of longitudinal modes to tone quality.

Straight strung geometry often requires the wound string portion of a scale to place the bass bridge mostly perpendicular to the line of the strings. This produces more coupling of longitudinal mode energy to transverse modes which often creates weird whistles, hoots, barks and clangs in wound scales.

In the early days of piano scales with cast plates, the wire was softer and produced less longitudinal mode energy. This is why when one rebuilds an old Pleyel, Erard or Broadwood, etc. and uses hard, modern wires the tone suffers.

I believe the most significant factor that gives the earlier pianos a desirable bass clarity is the lighter hammers that were used.

The other advantage to the modern overstrung scale is the fanning pattern to the strings across the bridge. This often reduces longitudinal mode coupling to transverse and allows the longer wave lengths of the bass transverse modes to reach down the bridge farther.

With the advent of the different Paulello wire types that allow placing softer wire types in portions of the lower compass it is perfectly feasible to have a piano scale that has both clarity and warmth in the lower portions of the compass.

You can come visit me an I will show you examples of these methods for you to experience. (Don't tell me to post video's, there is so much fakery that is possible with those methods that I refuse to engage that way.).
Posted By: D.P. Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/14/22 03:25 PM
I don't know much about piano design, but I did notice on a older Knabe I went to try that it had the bass strings in kind of a fan pattern. The lowest note looked to be completely straight while the rest gradually angled the higher you went up the scale. It was over 7' in length. I thought the bass was pretty nice. Didn't "growl" like a Steinway, but had a nice resonate rumble to it.
Posted By: Mirek Mastalerz Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 01/29/22 07:44 PM
The bass of my straight-stringed Malmsjo Concert Grand "Banana", produced in 1935, is simply captivating.




I am writing about this piano in this thread

http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthreads.php/topics/3189627/concert-grand-malmsjo-banana.html


https://pianino.waw.pl/malmsjo-banan/
Posted By: Ppianissimo Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 02/03/22 01:11 PM
hi fellow Chris Maene-lovers,

I have written before about my experience with the instruments of Chris Maene:
http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthre...ical-pianos-chris-maene.html#Post3166144

I do believe this is a difference that is much better heard live than in a recording. I liked the pianos by Chris Maene a lot for their character. They most clearly do not have the sound ideal that other builders go after and is unabashedly proud for it (and rightly so).

Originally Posted by Long Louis
One of the most spectacular new piano projects of the past years might be the return to straight strung concert grands by Chris Maene. Having heard one recital on sich a piano, I was deeply impressed by its sound. I am not sure if this was because of the good craftsmanship in general or an impact of the straight strings. Alas, I did not have the chance to play one yet.

It always both in my experience. Pianos already differ from instrument to instrument at a single builder. But Chris Maene straight strungs also have other different design choices than just being straight-strung, like a different metal used in the strings, smaller hammers, their own patented sound board, which I am sure also adds to sound differences. The craftsmanship is impeccable, it is a beautiful instrument also visually and not just technically. I can highly recommend playing one to find out for yourself.

Quote
Now this kind of pianos seem to hit your living rooms in a smaller version. Did anyone have the chance to play one already? Are the bass strings too short by now for a moving acoustic experience?

https://www.chrismaene.be/nl/the-straight-strung-grand-piano/parlor-grand-cm200/

I have played Chris Maene's longest instrument and some of the smaller ones (although not the 200cm one you describe). The smaller instruments were less powerful than the grandest - as usual. But they also offered a great palet for performance. A smaller piano in a smaller room might actually sound better - who knows?

Chis Maene is a voracious innovator, and I know for sure this is not the last special instrument he is building. I would watch carefully what he is trying to build, since his instruments are much more a living source of innovation rather than a steady design that he is trying to maintain. It is an incredibly brave endeavour!
Posted By: gwing Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 02/03/22 02:20 PM
Rather than straight strung I wonder how a piano with single strings would fair. For home use it presumably might have sufficient volume and would likely stay in acceptable tune for much longer without unisons to go sour.
Posted By: pyropaul Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 02/03/22 04:33 PM
Originally Posted by gwing
Rather than straight strung I wonder how a piano with single strings would fair. For home use it presumably might have sufficient volume and would likely stay in acceptable tune for much longer without unisons to go sour.

I saw a video of such a piano (upright). It sounded a bit bizarre - sort of like a harp - not a piano-type sound at all really. Sadly I can't compose a search on youtube that is bringing up that video.
Posted By: gwing Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 02/03/22 05:18 PM
Originally Posted by pyropaul
Originally Posted by gwing
Rather than straight strung I wonder how a piano with single strings would fair. For home use it presumably might have sufficient volume and would likely stay in acceptable tune for much longer without unisons to go sour.

I saw a video of such a piano (upright). It sounded a bit bizarre - sort of like a harp - not a piano-type sound at all really. Sadly I can't compose a search on youtube that is bringing up that video.

I found a couple on youtube, an old Tom Thumb piano which I rather liked and a new Klavins Una Corda piano which was rather un-pianolike in the recording sounding rather electronic processed and perhaps under damped. The Tom Thumb was rather nice and it would have been a practical small and light piano, presumably nothing aimed at truly high quality performance though. There wasn't much played in the higher notes -- presumably those would struggle more as they might lack power relative to the bass.
Posted By: WilliamTruitt Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 02/03/22 05:39 PM
Here is the Klavins m189 una corda concert upright playing Goldberg Variations. Does it stand on its own as a serious musical instrument? Single string, straight strung.

https://soundcloud.com/thepianoguy/jsbach-goldberg-variations-aria-var1-var2-var3
Posted By: Maestro Lennie Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 02/03/22 09:14 PM
Has anyone had a good look at the Doutreligne pianos that Maene makes? Not sure how much is theirs, and how much made elsewhere and tweaked. But it is truly under the radar and might be a good route to some of the older European sounds that many of us like.
Posted By: gwing Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 02/04/22 12:06 PM
Originally Posted by WilliamTruitt
Here is the Klavins m189 una corda concert upright playing Goldberg Variations. Does it stand on its own as a serious musical instrument? Single string, straight strung.

https://soundcloud.com/thepianoguy/jsbach-goldberg-variations-aria-var1-var2-var3

Thanks, that is a much better recording than the ones I found on youtube. I am liking it more as my ears become attuned to the sound.
Posted By: Ppianissimo Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 02/07/22 11:40 AM
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
Has anyone had a good look at the Doutreligne pianos that Maene makes? Not sure how much is theirs, and how much made elsewhere and tweaked. But it is truly under the radar and might be a good route to some of the older European sounds that many of us like.

I have not had an extensive look at the Doutreligne pianos, but of course could not resist playing the Doutreligne grand that I saw in the Chris Maene showrooms. They are aiming at the more traditional European sound ideal with these pianos, ie., they are quite different from the Chris Maene instruments. They play well, have a pleasant sound, well-rounded. I was told they are largely built outside Belgium, but finished in their workshop in Ruisselede. They seem quite affordable for the sound they produce. Unfortunately, I have not looked in detail so I cannot tell you much more.
Posted By: Maestro Lennie Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 02/07/22 04:06 PM
Any close peers you can think of, in quality or style?
Posted By: Ppianissimo Re: Chris Maene coming to your home? - 02/18/22 01:33 PM
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
Any close peers you can think of, in quality or style?

The Chris Maene instruments have no peer ;-). The straight strungs I think are completely unique. I have heard no second instrument that is anywhere close. To be very clear: it is not a modern reconstruction of older instruments. Chris Maene has a rich tradition in building fortepianos - he has an absolutely spectacular collection of playable historical instruments, partly new and some older instruments as well. The new CM grand pianos are build on a modern sound ideal, with modern projection and modern techniques. However, they are both different from other modern grands as well as historical instruments. So you cannot compare them to anything else I believe.

Doutreligne is much more of a mainstream brand and sound. I would compare them to a Boston or Estonia. Much closer to the Steinway sound perhaps, but with a bit more friendly and less brash character. They are good quality instruments, so I would definitely go and try them. Not sure where you could find them, but I assume Chris Maene's website could answer that question.
© Piano World Piano & Digital Piano Forums